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Article: Event-related potentials, configural enconding, and feature-based encoding in face recognition

TitleEvent-related potentials, configural enconding, and feature-based encoding in face recognition
Authors
KeywordsConfigural Encoding
Event-Related Potentials
Face Recognition
Inversion
Late Positive Complex
N200
N400
Issue Date2001
PublisherHogrefe & Huber Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hhpub.com/journals/jop
Citation
Journal Of Psychophysiology, 2001, v. 15 n. 4, p. 275-285 How to Cite?
AbstractThe effects of manipulating configural and feature information on the face recognition process were investigated by recording event-related potentials (ERPs) from five electrode sites (Fz, Cz, Pz, T5, T6), while 17 European subjects performed an own-race and other-race face recognition task. A series of upright faces were presented in a study phase, followed by a test phase where subjects indicated whether inverted and upright faces were studied or novel via a button press response. An inversion effect, illustrating the disruption of upright configural information, was reflected in accuracy measures and in greater lateral N2 amplitude to inverted faces, suggesting that structural encoding is harder for inverted faces. An own-race advantage was found, which may reflect the use of configural encoding for the more frequently experienced own-race faces, and feature-based encoding for the less familiar other-race faces, and was reflected in accuracy measures and ERP effects. The midline N2 was larger to configurally encoded faces (i. e., own-race and upright), possibly suggesting configural encoding involves more complex processing than feature-based encoding. An N400-like component was sensitive to feature manipulations, with greater amplitude to other-race than own-race faces and to inverted than upright faces. This effect was interpreted as reflecting increased activation of incompatible representations activated by a feature-based strategy used in processing of other-race and inverted faces. The late positive complex was sensitive to configural manipulation with larger amplitude to other-race than own-race faces, and was interpreted as reflecting the updating of an own-race norm used in face recognition, to incorporate other-race information.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168946
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.167
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.558
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJames, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnstone, SJen_US
dc.contributor.authorHayward, WGen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:39:57Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:39:57Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Psychophysiology, 2001, v. 15 n. 4, p. 275-285en_US
dc.identifier.issn0269-8803en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168946-
dc.description.abstractThe effects of manipulating configural and feature information on the face recognition process were investigated by recording event-related potentials (ERPs) from five electrode sites (Fz, Cz, Pz, T5, T6), while 17 European subjects performed an own-race and other-race face recognition task. A series of upright faces were presented in a study phase, followed by a test phase where subjects indicated whether inverted and upright faces were studied or novel via a button press response. An inversion effect, illustrating the disruption of upright configural information, was reflected in accuracy measures and in greater lateral N2 amplitude to inverted faces, suggesting that structural encoding is harder for inverted faces. An own-race advantage was found, which may reflect the use of configural encoding for the more frequently experienced own-race faces, and feature-based encoding for the less familiar other-race faces, and was reflected in accuracy measures and ERP effects. The midline N2 was larger to configurally encoded faces (i. e., own-race and upright), possibly suggesting configural encoding involves more complex processing than feature-based encoding. An N400-like component was sensitive to feature manipulations, with greater amplitude to other-race than own-race faces and to inverted than upright faces. This effect was interpreted as reflecting increased activation of incompatible representations activated by a feature-based strategy used in processing of other-race and inverted faces. The late positive complex was sensitive to configural manipulation with larger amplitude to other-race than own-race faces, and was interpreted as reflecting the updating of an own-race norm used in face recognition, to incorporate other-race information.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHogrefe & Huber Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hhpub.com/journals/jopen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Psychophysiologyen_US
dc.subjectConfigural Encodingen_US
dc.subjectEvent-Related Potentialsen_US
dc.subjectFace Recognitionen_US
dc.subjectInversionen_US
dc.subjectLate Positive Complexen_US
dc.subjectN200en_US
dc.subjectN400en_US
dc.titleEvent-related potentials, configural enconding, and feature-based encoding in face recognitionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHayward, WG:whayward@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHayward, WG=rp00630en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1027//0269-8803.15.4.275en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035721424en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035721424&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume15en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage275en_US
dc.identifier.epage285en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000174680900004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJames, MS=7402505976en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJohnstone, SJ=7006427797en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHayward, WG=7006352956en_US

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