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Article: Computer usage and its relationship with adolescent lifestyle in Hong Kong

TitleComputer usage and its relationship with adolescent lifestyle in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsAdolescent lifestyle
Gender Differences
Health
Hong Kong
Information technology
Internet
Usage of computer
Issue Date2001
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jadohea
Citation
Journal Of Adolescent Health, 2001, v. 29 n. 4, p. 258-266 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: To determine the patterns of computer usage among adolescents in Hong Kong and to examine whether computer usage is associated with less physical activity and social support among adolescents. Methods: A total of 2110 secondary school students (52% boys and 48% girls) in Hong Kong completed a set of questionnaires to measure their computer usage and lifestyle. Mean age of the respondents was 14.16 years (SD = 1.81 years). Computer usage was taped by asking the students to indicate how much time (in minutes) they spent on the computer each day for doing homework assignments; playing computer games; "surfing" the Internet; and communicating with others. The students also provided information on their social-physical lifestyle. Student's t-tests and analysis of variance were used to examine group differences. Pearson product moment correlations were used to explore relationships between computer usage and lifestyle. Results: Boys who use computers for doing homework, "surfing" the Internet, and communicating with others engage in more social-physical activities than others. Boys who use computers to play games tend to be more social-behaviorally inactive. For girls, patterns of computer usage are not related to lifestyle. Conclusions: Computer users tended to engage in social-physical activities more frequently and had higher social support than nonusers. But among computer users, the amount of time spent daily on the computer was not associated with lifestyle. Instead, patterns of computer usage are more related to lifestyle and the relationship is moderated by gender. © Society for Adolescent Medicine, 2001.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168943
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.838
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.910
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, SMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:39:56Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:39:56Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Adolescent Health, 2001, v. 29 n. 4, p. 258-266en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1054-139Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168943-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To determine the patterns of computer usage among adolescents in Hong Kong and to examine whether computer usage is associated with less physical activity and social support among adolescents. Methods: A total of 2110 secondary school students (52% boys and 48% girls) in Hong Kong completed a set of questionnaires to measure their computer usage and lifestyle. Mean age of the respondents was 14.16 years (SD = 1.81 years). Computer usage was taped by asking the students to indicate how much time (in minutes) they spent on the computer each day for doing homework assignments; playing computer games; "surfing" the Internet; and communicating with others. The students also provided information on their social-physical lifestyle. Student's t-tests and analysis of variance were used to examine group differences. Pearson product moment correlations were used to explore relationships between computer usage and lifestyle. Results: Boys who use computers for doing homework, "surfing" the Internet, and communicating with others engage in more social-physical activities than others. Boys who use computers to play games tend to be more social-behaviorally inactive. For girls, patterns of computer usage are not related to lifestyle. Conclusions: Computer users tended to engage in social-physical activities more frequently and had higher social support than nonusers. But among computer users, the amount of time spent daily on the computer was not associated with lifestyle. Instead, patterns of computer usage are more related to lifestyle and the relationship is moderated by gender. © Society for Adolescent Medicine, 2001.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jadoheaen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Adolescent Healthen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Adolescent Health. Copyright © Elsevier Inc.-
dc.subjectAdolescent lifestyleen_HK
dc.subjectGender Differencesen_HK
dc.subjectHealthen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectInformation technologyen_HK
dc.subjectInterneten_HK
dc.subjectUsage of computeren_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescent Behavior - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshAnalysis Of Varianceen_US
dc.subject.meshComputersen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInterpersonal Relationsen_US
dc.subject.meshLife Styleen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshVideo Gamesen_US
dc.titleComputer usage and its relationship with adolescent lifestyle in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SMY: munyin@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, TMC: tmclee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SMY=rp00554en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, TMC=rp00564en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1054-139X(01)00261-0en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11587909-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034816805en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros74547-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034816805&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume29en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage258en_HK
dc.identifier.epage266en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000171209100004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SMY=25722730500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, TMC=7501437381en_HK

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