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Article: Gender-role differences in susceptibility to the influence of support availability on depression

TitleGender-role differences in susceptibility to the influence of support availability on depression
Authors
Issue Date1999
Citation
Journal Of Personality, 1999, v. 67 n. 3, p. 439-467 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious gender-role research on depression has revealed a consistent inverse relationship between masculinity and depression, but a non-significant relationship between femininity and depression. In light of the stronger affiliative needs for feminine individuals, received social support was speculated to moderate the relationship between femininity and depression in the present research. In a longitudinal study of a sample of Hong Kong college students, the relationships among gender-role orientation, received social support, and depression were examined. Consistent with previous findings, masculinity and androgyny were inversely related to depression. Moreover, the present study supplemented previous research by revealing that femininity was related to depression through its interaction with received social support. When the amount of received social support was increased, femininity was associated with a reduction in depression level over time. In contrast, when the amount of received social support was decreased, depression tended to increase with femininity over time. The findings are discussed in terms of their implications for the gender-role literature.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168933
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.657
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.372
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:39:50Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:39:50Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Personality, 1999, v. 67 n. 3, p. 439-467en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-3506en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168933-
dc.description.abstractPrevious gender-role research on depression has revealed a consistent inverse relationship between masculinity and depression, but a non-significant relationship between femininity and depression. In light of the stronger affiliative needs for feminine individuals, received social support was speculated to moderate the relationship between femininity and depression in the present research. In a longitudinal study of a sample of Hong Kong college students, the relationships among gender-role orientation, received social support, and depression were examined. Consistent with previous findings, masculinity and androgyny were inversely related to depression. Moreover, the present study supplemented previous research by revealing that femininity was related to depression through its interaction with received social support. When the amount of received social support was increased, femininity was associated with a reduction in depression level over time. In contrast, when the amount of received social support was decreased, depression tended to increase with femininity over time. The findings are discussed in terms of their implications for the gender-role literature.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Personalityen_US
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshDepression - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGender Identityen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMultivariate Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshPersonality Testsen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scalesen_US
dc.subject.meshReproducibility Of Resultsen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Supporten_US
dc.titleGender-role differences in susceptibility to the influence of support availability on depressionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheng, C:ceci-cheng@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheng, C=rp00588en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1467-6494.00061-
dc.identifier.pmid10483117-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033146832en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033146832&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume67en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage439en_US
dc.identifier.epage467en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, C=7404798168en_US

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