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Article: Spatial language and spatial representation

TitleSpatial language and spatial representation
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cognit
Citation
Cognition, 1995, v. 55 n. 1, p. 39-84 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study explores the commonalities between linguistic and visual representations of space. In particular, because common types of spatial relations, specifically closed-class spatial forms in language and qualitative spatial relations in perception, have been proposed in both representational systems, we investigate whether they share underlying structural similarities. Moreover, while visual spatial relations are a basic element of several theories of object representation, they have been characterized mainly in terms of their linguistic counterparts and without direct evidence about their organization. In order to illuminate the nature of these structures, as well as demonstrate possible correspondences between the two systems, we compare how the spatial relationship between pairs of objects in a scene is encoded linguistically and visually. Spatial language was investigated by having subjects either generate (Experiment 1) or rate the applicability of (Experiment 2) spatial terms for describing the spatial relationship between object pairs. Both the frequency of use and the applicability of spatial terms were highest when the two objects were in vertical or in horizontal alignment. Spatial representation was investigated by paradigms in which subjects either recalled the position of one object relative to the other (Experiment 3) or judged whether one object presented sequentially was in the same or a different position relative to the other (Experiment 4). The accuracy of position estimates and the sensitivity to shifts in position were both highest when the rated object was in a spatial location where spatial terms had been judged to have high applicability in Experiments 1 and 2. These results indicate that the structure of space as encoded by language may be determined by the structure of spatial relations in visual representation. © 1995.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168916
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.411
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.770
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHayward, WGen_US
dc.contributor.authorTarr, MJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:39:37Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:39:37Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citationCognition, 1995, v. 55 n. 1, p. 39-84en_US
dc.identifier.issn0010-0277en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168916-
dc.description.abstractThis study explores the commonalities between linguistic and visual representations of space. In particular, because common types of spatial relations, specifically closed-class spatial forms in language and qualitative spatial relations in perception, have been proposed in both representational systems, we investigate whether they share underlying structural similarities. Moreover, while visual spatial relations are a basic element of several theories of object representation, they have been characterized mainly in terms of their linguistic counterparts and without direct evidence about their organization. In order to illuminate the nature of these structures, as well as demonstrate possible correspondences between the two systems, we compare how the spatial relationship between pairs of objects in a scene is encoded linguistically and visually. Spatial language was investigated by having subjects either generate (Experiment 1) or rate the applicability of (Experiment 2) spatial terms for describing the spatial relationship between object pairs. Both the frequency of use and the applicability of spatial terms were highest when the two objects were in vertical or in horizontal alignment. Spatial representation was investigated by paradigms in which subjects either recalled the position of one object relative to the other (Experiment 3) or judged whether one object presented sequentially was in the same or a different position relative to the other (Experiment 4). The accuracy of position estimates and the sensitivity to shifts in position were both highest when the rated object was in a spatial location where spatial terms had been judged to have high applicability in Experiments 1 and 2. These results indicate that the structure of space as encoded by language may be determined by the structure of spatial relations in visual representation. © 1995.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cogniten_US
dc.relation.ispartofCognitionen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshConcept Formationen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshOrientationen_US
dc.subject.meshPattern Recognition, Visualen_US
dc.subject.meshPsycholinguisticsen_US
dc.subject.meshSemanticsen_US
dc.subject.meshSpace Perceptionen_US
dc.titleSpatial language and spatial representationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHayward, WG:whayward@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHayward, WG=rp00630en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0010-0277(94)00643-Y-
dc.identifier.pmid7758270-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029282578en_US
dc.identifier.volume55en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage39en_US
dc.identifier.epage84en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995QP65300002-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHayward, WG=7006352956en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTarr, MJ=7004804270en_US

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