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Article: Cross-cultural training across the individualism-collectivism divide

TitleCross-cultural training across the individualism-collectivism divide
Authors
Issue Date1988
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijintrel
Citation
International Journal Of Intercultural Relations, 1988, v. 12 n. 3, p. 269-289 How to Cite?
AbstractThe concepts of individualism and collectivism are suggested as important topics for coverage in cross-cultural training programs. Individualism is characterized by the subordination of a group's goals to a person's own goals. Collectivism is characterized by individuals subordinating their personal goals to the goals of some collectives. The collective is often the extended family, although it can also be a work group (e.g., Japan). There are also individual differences within cultures. Allocentric individuals pay primary attention to the needs of their group and will sacrifice opportunities for personal gain to the good of the group, Further, they may actively enjoy such sacrifice since their sense of self is largely tied to a collective. Idiocentric individuals pay more attention to their own needs than to the needs of others. They will take advantage of opportunities for personal enrichment, such as a high paying job in a distant community, even though it means moving far away from their elderly parents. Conclusions about cultural differences can be summarized in the form of advice useful to individualists moving into a collective culture, and collectivists moving into an individualist culture. For instance, collectivists who interact extensively with individualists find that they have to learn to talk about personal accomplishments; to establish short-term relationships (a network); to pay more attention to contracts; to engage in fewer obvious superordinate and subordinate behaviors depending on others' status levels; and to communicate why certain collective behaviors must take place to maintain a sense of self worth. Individualists who interact extensively with collectivists find that they have to pay attention to people's group memberships to understand behaviors which take place; to develop long-term relationships based on trust; to criticize very carefully, only when necessary and never when a person may lose face in front of members of the collective; to understand illicit behavior which benefits the collective but puts outgroups at a disadvantage; and to be more sensitive to status hierarchies. Suggestions are given for integrating such advice into existing cross-cultural training models. © 1988.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168892
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.963
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.581
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTriandis, HCen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrislin, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorHui, CHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:39:27Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:39:27Z-
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Intercultural Relations, 1988, v. 12 n. 3, p. 269-289en_US
dc.identifier.issn0147-1767en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168892-
dc.description.abstractThe concepts of individualism and collectivism are suggested as important topics for coverage in cross-cultural training programs. Individualism is characterized by the subordination of a group's goals to a person's own goals. Collectivism is characterized by individuals subordinating their personal goals to the goals of some collectives. The collective is often the extended family, although it can also be a work group (e.g., Japan). There are also individual differences within cultures. Allocentric individuals pay primary attention to the needs of their group and will sacrifice opportunities for personal gain to the good of the group, Further, they may actively enjoy such sacrifice since their sense of self is largely tied to a collective. Idiocentric individuals pay more attention to their own needs than to the needs of others. They will take advantage of opportunities for personal enrichment, such as a high paying job in a distant community, even though it means moving far away from their elderly parents. Conclusions about cultural differences can be summarized in the form of advice useful to individualists moving into a collective culture, and collectivists moving into an individualist culture. For instance, collectivists who interact extensively with individualists find that they have to learn to talk about personal accomplishments; to establish short-term relationships (a network); to pay more attention to contracts; to engage in fewer obvious superordinate and subordinate behaviors depending on others' status levels; and to communicate why certain collective behaviors must take place to maintain a sense of self worth. Individualists who interact extensively with collectivists find that they have to pay attention to people's group memberships to understand behaviors which take place; to develop long-term relationships based on trust; to criticize very carefully, only when necessary and never when a person may lose face in front of members of the collective; to understand illicit behavior which benefits the collective but puts outgroups at a disadvantage; and to be more sensitive to status hierarchies. Suggestions are given for integrating such advice into existing cross-cultural training models. © 1988.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijintrelen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Intercultural Relationsen_US
dc.titleCross-cultural training across the individualism-collectivism divideen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHui, CH:huiharry@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHui, CH=rp00547en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0147-1767(88)90019-3-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0000598386en_US
dc.identifier.volume12en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage269en_US
dc.identifier.epage289en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1988Q294800005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTriandis, HC=7004112944en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBrislin, R=6603586827en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, CH=16947154300en_US

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