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Article: Problems with specialist subcontracting in the construction industry

TitleProblems with specialist subcontracting in the construction industry
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://bse.sagepub.com
Citation
Building Services Engineering Research And Technology, 2006, v. 27 n. 3, p. 183-193 How to Cite?
AbstractIt is envisaged that more and more specialist works will be employed in modern buildings for enhancing performance and sustainability. Subcontracting is an economical way of procuring specialist works for modern buildings but it may also give rise to various kinds of problems. Such problems may originate from the characteristics of the specialist works and from subcontracting as a procurement method. In the paper, the key characteristics of specialist works are identified and their implications are analysed. Through discussing how new technologies penetrate the market, the pricing strategies that vendors of new technologies may adopt together with their implications are unveiled. The problems with procuring specialist works through subcontracting are then reviewed, and the issues that building developers should take note of in deciding to equip a building with a specialist work and in procurement and management of the specialist subcontract are highlighted and discussed. Practical application: By providing an in-depth exposition on subcontracting within the construction industry, the paper can act as a source of information and guide for those initiating and managing projects that involve substantial amounts of subcontracting, especially to project clients when they procure specialist works through subcontracting. The potential problems discussed include not only those that may arise during the construction stage, readers' attention is also drawn to the impacts on operation and maintenance and the aftermarket monopoly power of vendors of proprietary products and services. © The Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers 2006.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168750
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.575
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.369
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYik, FWHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, JHKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYiu, ECYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:32:05Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:32:05Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBuilding Services Engineering Research And Technology, 2006, v. 27 n. 3, p. 183-193en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0143-6244en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168750-
dc.description.abstractIt is envisaged that more and more specialist works will be employed in modern buildings for enhancing performance and sustainability. Subcontracting is an economical way of procuring specialist works for modern buildings but it may also give rise to various kinds of problems. Such problems may originate from the characteristics of the specialist works and from subcontracting as a procurement method. In the paper, the key characteristics of specialist works are identified and their implications are analysed. Through discussing how new technologies penetrate the market, the pricing strategies that vendors of new technologies may adopt together with their implications are unveiled. The problems with procuring specialist works through subcontracting are then reviewed, and the issues that building developers should take note of in deciding to equip a building with a specialist work and in procurement and management of the specialist subcontract are highlighted and discussed. Practical application: By providing an in-depth exposition on subcontracting within the construction industry, the paper can act as a source of information and guide for those initiating and managing projects that involve substantial amounts of subcontracting, especially to project clients when they procure specialist works through subcontracting. The potential problems discussed include not only those that may arise during the construction stage, readers' attention is also drawn to the impacts on operation and maintenance and the aftermarket monopoly power of vendors of proprietary products and services. © The Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers 2006.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://bse.sagepub.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBuilding Services Engineering Research and Technologyen_HK
dc.titleProblems with specialist subcontracting in the construction industryen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYiu, ECY: ecyyiu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYiu, ECY=rp01035en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1191/0143624406bse160oaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33748261829en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33748261829&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume27en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage183en_HK
dc.identifier.epage193en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000242964900002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYik, FWH=7004635616en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, JHK=8227257600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KT=13310352400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYiu, ECY=9248825800en_HK

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