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Article: In situ transmission electron microscopy of electrochemical lithiation, delithiation and deformation of individual graphene nanoribbons
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TitleIn situ transmission electron microscopy of electrochemical lithiation, delithiation and deformation of individual graphene nanoribbons
 
AuthorsLiu, XH2
Wang, JW6
Liu, Y2
Zheng, H6 5
Kushima, A1
Huang, S7
Zhu, T7
Mao, SX6
Li, J1
Zhang, S4
Lu, W3
Tour, JM3
Huang, JY2
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/carbon
 
CitationCarbon, 2012, v. 50 n. 10, p. 3836-3844 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.carbon.2012.04.025
 
AbstractWe report an in situ transmission electron microscopy study of the electrochemical behavior of few-layer graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) synthesized by longitudinal splitting the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Upon lithiation, the GNRs were covered by a nanocrystalline lithium oxide layer attached to the surfaces and edges of the GNRs, most of which were removed upon delithiation, indicating that the lithiation/delithiation processes occurred predominantly at the surfaces of GNRs. The lithiated GNRs were mechanically robust during the tension and compression tests, in sharp contrast to the easy and brittle fracture of the lithiated MWCNTs. This difference is attributed to the unconfined stacking of planar carbon layers in GNRs leading to a weak coupling between the intralayer and interlayer deformations, as opposed to the cylindrically confined carbon nanotubes where the interlayer lithium produces large tensile hoop stresses within the circumferentially-closed carbon layers, causing the ease of brittle fracture. These results suggest substantial promise of graphene for building durable batteries. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0008-6223
2012 Impact Factor: 5.868
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.183
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.carbon.2012.04.025
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLiu, XH
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, JW
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorZheng, H
 
dc.contributor.authorKushima, A
 
dc.contributor.authorHuang, S
 
dc.contributor.authorZhu, T
 
dc.contributor.authorMao, SX
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, J
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, S
 
dc.contributor.authorLu, W
 
dc.contributor.authorTour, JM
 
dc.contributor.authorHuang, JY
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:21:48Z
 
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:21:48Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractWe report an in situ transmission electron microscopy study of the electrochemical behavior of few-layer graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) synthesized by longitudinal splitting the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Upon lithiation, the GNRs were covered by a nanocrystalline lithium oxide layer attached to the surfaces and edges of the GNRs, most of which were removed upon delithiation, indicating that the lithiation/delithiation processes occurred predominantly at the surfaces of GNRs. The lithiated GNRs were mechanically robust during the tension and compression tests, in sharp contrast to the easy and brittle fracture of the lithiated MWCNTs. This difference is attributed to the unconfined stacking of planar carbon layers in GNRs leading to a weak coupling between the intralayer and interlayer deformations, as opposed to the cylindrically confined carbon nanotubes where the interlayer lithium produces large tensile hoop stresses within the circumferentially-closed carbon layers, causing the ease of brittle fracture. These results suggest substantial promise of graphene for building durable batteries. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationCarbon, 2012, v. 50 n. 10, p. 3836-3844 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.carbon.2012.04.025
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.carbon.2012.04.025
 
dc.identifier.epage3844
 
dc.identifier.issn0008-6223
2012 Impact Factor: 5.868
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.183
 
dc.identifier.issue10
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84861602380
 
dc.identifier.spage3836
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168631
 
dc.identifier.volume50
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/carbon
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofCarbon
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.titleIn situ transmission electron microscopy of electrochemical lithiation, delithiation and deformation of individual graphene nanoribbons
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  2. Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico
  3. Rice University
  4. Pennsylvania State University
  5. Wuhan University
  6. University of Pittsburgh
  7. The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering