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Article: Did transmission of Helicobacter pylori from humans cause a disease outbreak in a colony of Stripe-faced Dunnarts (Sminthopsis macroura)?

TitleDid transmission of Helicobacter pylori from humans cause a disease outbreak in a colony of Stripe-faced Dunnarts (Sminthopsis macroura)?
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherEDP Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.edpsciences.org
Citation
Veterinary Research, 2011, v. 42 n. 1 How to Cite?
AbstractSince the discovery that Helicobacter pylori causes a range of pathologies in the stomachs of infected humans, it has become apparent that Helicobacters are found in a diverse range of animal species where they are frequently associated with disease. In 2003 and 2004, there were two outbreaks of increased mortality associated with gastric bleeding and weight-loss in a captive colony of the Australian marsupial, the Stripe-faced Dunnart (Sminthopsis macroura). The presence of gastric pathology led to an investigation of potential Helicobacter pathogenesis in these animals. Histological examination revealed the presence of gastritis, and PCR analysis confirmed the presence of Helicobacter infection in the stomachs of these marsupials. Surprisingly, sequencing of 16S rRNA from these bacteria identified the species as H. pylori and PCR confirmed the strain to be positive for the important pathogenesis factor, cagA. We therefore describe, for the first time, an apparent reverse zoonotic infection of Stripe-faced Dunnarts with H. pylori. Already prone to pathological effects of stress (as experienced during breeding season), concomitant H. pylori infection appears to be a possible essential but not sufficient co-factor in prototypic gastric bleeding and weight loss in these marsupials. The Stripe-faced Dunnart could represent a new model for investigating Helicobacter-driven gastric pathology. Infections from their human handlers, specifically of H. pylori, may be a potential risk to captive colonies of marsupials. © 2011 Every et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168557
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.928
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.403
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEvery, ALen_US
dc.contributor.authorSelwood, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorCastanoRodriguez, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorLu, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorWindsor, HMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWee, JLen_US
dc.contributor.authorSwierczak, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, BJen_US
dc.contributor.authorKaakoush, NOen_US
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, HMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSutton, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:20:35Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:20:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationVeterinary Research, 2011, v. 42 n. 1en_US
dc.identifier.issn0928-4249en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168557-
dc.description.abstractSince the discovery that Helicobacter pylori causes a range of pathologies in the stomachs of infected humans, it has become apparent that Helicobacters are found in a diverse range of animal species where they are frequently associated with disease. In 2003 and 2004, there were two outbreaks of increased mortality associated with gastric bleeding and weight-loss in a captive colony of the Australian marsupial, the Stripe-faced Dunnart (Sminthopsis macroura). The presence of gastric pathology led to an investigation of potential Helicobacter pathogenesis in these animals. Histological examination revealed the presence of gastritis, and PCR analysis confirmed the presence of Helicobacter infection in the stomachs of these marsupials. Surprisingly, sequencing of 16S rRNA from these bacteria identified the species as H. pylori and PCR confirmed the strain to be positive for the important pathogenesis factor, cagA. We therefore describe, for the first time, an apparent reverse zoonotic infection of Stripe-faced Dunnarts with H. pylori. Already prone to pathological effects of stress (as experienced during breeding season), concomitant H. pylori infection appears to be a possible essential but not sufficient co-factor in prototypic gastric bleeding and weight loss in these marsupials. The Stripe-faced Dunnart could represent a new model for investigating Helicobacter-driven gastric pathology. Infections from their human handlers, specifically of H. pylori, may be a potential risk to captive colonies of marsupials. © 2011 Every et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherEDP Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.edpsciences.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofVeterinary Researchen_US
dc.titleDid transmission of Helicobacter pylori from humans cause a disease outbreak in a colony of Stripe-faced Dunnarts (Sminthopsis macroura)?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLu, W:luwei@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLu, W=rp00754en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1297-9716-42-26en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21314909-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052011929en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80052011929&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume42en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000290660600006-
dc.publisher.placeFranceen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEvery, AL=16506036600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSelwood, L=7006008970en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCastanoRodriguez, N=23099355700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, W=27868087600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWindsor, HM=36869133300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWee, JL=55026306800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSwierczak, A=16507973600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMarshall, BJ=7202280032en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKaakoush, NO=8833063900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMitchell, HM=7202670433en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSutton, P=7102274921en_US

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