File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Housing intermediary services in China: The rise and fall of 'Fang Wu Yin Hang'

TitleHousing intermediary services in China: The rise and fall of 'Fang Wu Yin Hang'
Authors
KeywordsChina
Housing transactions
Institutions
Issue Date2006
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=1566-4910
Citation
Journal Of Housing And The Built Environment, 2006, v. 21 n. 4, p. 337-354 How to Cite?
AbstractHousing reforms in China are often conceived to have engendered a gradual shift towards a market system. New institutions have been introduced to enable decentralized, monetarized and privatized allocation of housing units. This study explores the emergence, growth and downfall of an intermediary service (known as 'fang wu yin hang') created spontaneously by real estate agents to facilitate housing transactions in the Chinese cities. Although this new institution looked capable of strengthening the rationality, efficiency, transparency and impersonality of China's housing market, it was abandoned soon after its inception. The failure of this transient service suggests the presence of some social institutions, which could have blocked China's progress towards a full-fledged market system in the housing sector. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167150
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.81
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.648
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTang, BSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHaila, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, SWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-28T04:04:37Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-28T04:04:37Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Housing And The Built Environment, 2006, v. 21 n. 4, p. 337-354en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1566-4910en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167150-
dc.description.abstractHousing reforms in China are often conceived to have engendered a gradual shift towards a market system. New institutions have been introduced to enable decentralized, monetarized and privatized allocation of housing units. This study explores the emergence, growth and downfall of an intermediary service (known as 'fang wu yin hang') created spontaneously by real estate agents to facilitate housing transactions in the Chinese cities. Although this new institution looked capable of strengthening the rationality, efficiency, transparency and impersonality of China's housing market, it was abandoned soon after its inception. The failure of this transient service suggests the presence of some social institutions, which could have blocked China's progress towards a full-fledged market system in the housing sector. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=1566-4910en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Housing and the Built Environmenten_HK
dc.subjectChinaen_HK
dc.subjectHousing transactionsen_HK
dc.subjectInstitutionsen_HK
dc.titleHousing intermediary services in China: The rise and fall of 'Fang Wu Yin Hang'en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTang, BS: bsbstang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTang, BS=rp01646en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10901-006-9053-6en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33845274758en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33845274758&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume21en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage337en_HK
dc.identifier.epage354en_HK
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, BS=7402560881en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHaila, A=6506583646en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, SW=8708453300en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike1003027-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats