File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Testing the assumptions behind emissions trading in non-market goods: The RECLAIM program in Southern California

TitleTesting the assumptions behind emissions trading in non-market goods: The RECLAIM program in Southern California
Authors
KeywordsEmissions trading
Environmental policy
RECLAIM
Issue Date2005
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envsci
Citation
Environmental Science And Policy, 2005, v. 8 n. 4, p. 367-377 How to Cite?
AbstractEmissions trading is, essentially, a policy instrument that is designed to simulate a market for an otherwise public good. Conceptually, its justification hinges on a number of key assumptions, namely the negligibility of local impacts, the ability to separate and commodify the good in question, and characteristics of a well-functioning market. The authors examine the performance of RECLAIM, a NOx emissions trading program in Southern California, USA, and illustrate how to test these assumptions. There is some evidence that the trading of NOx generates new externalities, such as the possibility that other air pollutants, e.g. volatile organics, are essentially traded along with it. Moreover, the RECLAIM program has recently begun to experience difficulties due to the fact that the market is relatively thin. This analysis provides ways to assess more deeply and reform these trading regimes, including opening up RECLAIM to public review. The case study speaks to a wider arena, as emissions trading is presently being considered in other parts of the world to address issues ranging from acid rain to non-point source pollution to greenhouse gases. The analytic approach, illustrated herein, is a general one that has a wider applicability than the particular case of NOx trading. It is hoped that this kind of critical inquiry can lead to a more careful deliberation of the merits and challenges of emissions trading. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167133
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.972
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.656
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLejano, RPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHirose, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-28T04:04:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-28T04:04:33Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Science And Policy, 2005, v. 8 n. 4, p. 367-377en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1462-9011en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167133-
dc.description.abstractEmissions trading is, essentially, a policy instrument that is designed to simulate a market for an otherwise public good. Conceptually, its justification hinges on a number of key assumptions, namely the negligibility of local impacts, the ability to separate and commodify the good in question, and characteristics of a well-functioning market. The authors examine the performance of RECLAIM, a NOx emissions trading program in Southern California, USA, and illustrate how to test these assumptions. There is some evidence that the trading of NOx generates new externalities, such as the possibility that other air pollutants, e.g. volatile organics, are essentially traded along with it. Moreover, the RECLAIM program has recently begun to experience difficulties due to the fact that the market is relatively thin. This analysis provides ways to assess more deeply and reform these trading regimes, including opening up RECLAIM to public review. The case study speaks to a wider arena, as emissions trading is presently being considered in other parts of the world to address issues ranging from acid rain to non-point source pollution to greenhouse gases. The analytic approach, illustrated herein, is a general one that has a wider applicability than the particular case of NOx trading. It is hoped that this kind of critical inquiry can lead to a more careful deliberation of the merits and challenges of emissions trading. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envscien_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Science and Policyen_HK
dc.subjectEmissions tradingen_HK
dc.subjectEnvironmental policyen_HK
dc.subjectRECLAIMen_HK
dc.titleTesting the assumptions behind emissions trading in non-market goods: The RECLAIM program in Southern Californiaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLejano, RP: lejano@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLejano, RP=rp01666en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.envsci.2005.04.006en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-22144457021en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-22144457021&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume8en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage367en_HK
dc.identifier.epage377en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000231352300004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLejano, RP=6602298801en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHirose, R=8620238900en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats