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Article: Globalization and construction industry development: Implications of recent developments in the construction sector in Asia

TitleGlobalization and construction industry development: Implications of recent developments in the construction sector in Asia
Authors
KeywordsAsia
Construction
Construction industry development
Globalization
Issue Date1998
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/01446193.asp
Citation
Construction Management And Economics, 1998, v. 16 n. 6, p. 729-737 How to Cite?
Abstract
Recent developments in the construction sector in the Asian region demonstrate three trends: (1) larger private sector participation in infrastructure projects, (2) increasing vertical integration in the packaging of construction projects, and (3) increased foreign participation in domestic construction. This paper attributes the trends to the globalization and deregulation of markets necessitated by fiscal, technological and managerial constraints. Although these trends present intra-Asian opportunities, there are also areas of concern. The trends have helped polarize the financial and technical superiority of the developed countries and the corresponding inferiority of the developed countries in the region of the developing ones. In the long term, this gap could be filled through technology transfer. In the short term, however, there are concerns that imported construction services could grow at the expense of the indigenous sectors of the developing countries. This paper illustrates this dilemma with the case of Japan as a world leader in international construction services. Its dominance has apparently come through the orchestration of industrial and corporate policies, implemented in a highly regulated and protected domestic market. However, construction industries in other Asian economies (such as China) will have to leapfrog in technology, finance and management know-how (e.g. through joint ventures with developed countries' construction companies) before they can become formidable powers in an environment that has become much more global, more de-regulated, more open and more competitive than before.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167117
ISSN
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRaftery, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPasadilla, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorChiang, YHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHui, ECMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, BSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-28T04:04:29Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-28T04:04:29Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationConstruction Management And Economics, 1998, v. 16 n. 6, p. 729-737en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0144-6193en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167117-
dc.description.abstractRecent developments in the construction sector in the Asian region demonstrate three trends: (1) larger private sector participation in infrastructure projects, (2) increasing vertical integration in the packaging of construction projects, and (3) increased foreign participation in domestic construction. This paper attributes the trends to the globalization and deregulation of markets necessitated by fiscal, technological and managerial constraints. Although these trends present intra-Asian opportunities, there are also areas of concern. The trends have helped polarize the financial and technical superiority of the developed countries and the corresponding inferiority of the developed countries in the region of the developing ones. In the long term, this gap could be filled through technology transfer. In the short term, however, there are concerns that imported construction services could grow at the expense of the indigenous sectors of the developing countries. This paper illustrates this dilemma with the case of Japan as a world leader in international construction services. Its dominance has apparently come through the orchestration of industrial and corporate policies, implemented in a highly regulated and protected domestic market. However, construction industries in other Asian economies (such as China) will have to leapfrog in technology, finance and management know-how (e.g. through joint ventures with developed countries' construction companies) before they can become formidable powers in an environment that has become much more global, more de-regulated, more open and more competitive than before.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/01446193.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofConstruction Management and Economicsen_HK
dc.subjectAsiaen_HK
dc.subjectConstructionen_HK
dc.subjectConstruction industry developmenten_HK
dc.subjectGlobalizationen_HK
dc.titleGlobalization and construction industry development: Implications of recent developments in the construction sector in Asiaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTang, BS: bsbstang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTang, BS=rp01646en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0000381008en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0000381008&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume16en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage729en_HK
dc.identifier.epage737en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRaftery, J=7004558123en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPasadilla, B=6504074152en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiang, YH=7201593363en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, ECM=7005081892en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, BS=7402560881en_HK

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