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Article: The interactive examination: Assessing students' self-assessment ability

TitleThe interactive examination: Assessing students' self-assessment ability
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0308-0110
Citation
Medical Education, 2004, v. 38 n. 4, p. 378-389 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: The ability to self-assess one's competence is a crucial skill for all health professionals. The interactive examination is an assessment model aiming to evaluate not only students' clinical skills and competence, but also their ability to self-assess their proficiency. METHODS: The methodology utilised students' own self-assessment, an answer to a written essay question and a group discussion. Students' self-assessment was matched to the judgement of their instructors. As a final task, students compared their own essay to one written by an 'expert'. The differences pointed by students in their comparison documents and the accompanying arguments were analysed and categorised. Students received individual feedback on their performance and learning needs. The model was tested on 1 cohort of undergraduate dental students (year 2001, n = 52) in their third semester of studies, replacing an older form of examination in the discipline of clinical periodontology. RESULTS: Students' acceptance of the methodology was very positive. Students tended to overestimate their competence in relation to the judgement of their instructors in diagnostic skills, but not in skills relevant to treatment. No gender differences were observed, although females performed better than males in the examination. Three categories of differences were observed in the students' comparison documents. The accompanying arguments may reveal students' understanding and methods of prioritising. CONCLUSIONS: Students tended to overestimate their competence in diagnostic rather than treatment skills. The interactive examination appeared to be a convenient tool for providing deeper insight into students' ability to prioritise, self-assess and steer their own learning.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167025
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.369
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.913
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMattheos, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorNattestad, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorFalkNilsson, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorAttström, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-28T04:01:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-28T04:01:59Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationMedical Education, 2004, v. 38 n. 4, p. 378-389en_US
dc.identifier.issn0308-0110en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167025-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The ability to self-assess one's competence is a crucial skill for all health professionals. The interactive examination is an assessment model aiming to evaluate not only students' clinical skills and competence, but also their ability to self-assess their proficiency. METHODS: The methodology utilised students' own self-assessment, an answer to a written essay question and a group discussion. Students' self-assessment was matched to the judgement of their instructors. As a final task, students compared their own essay to one written by an 'expert'. The differences pointed by students in their comparison documents and the accompanying arguments were analysed and categorised. Students received individual feedback on their performance and learning needs. The model was tested on 1 cohort of undergraduate dental students (year 2001, n = 52) in their third semester of studies, replacing an older form of examination in the discipline of clinical periodontology. RESULTS: Students' acceptance of the methodology was very positive. Students tended to overestimate their competence in relation to the judgement of their instructors in diagnostic skills, but not in skills relevant to treatment. No gender differences were observed, although females performed better than males in the examination. Three categories of differences were observed in the students' comparison documents. The accompanying arguments may reveal students' understanding and methods of prioritising. CONCLUSIONS: Students tended to overestimate their competence in diagnostic rather than treatment skills. The interactive examination appeared to be a convenient tool for providing deeper insight into students' ability to prioritise, self-assess and steer their own learning.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0308-0110en_US
dc.relation.ispartofMedical Educationen_US
dc.subject.meshClinical Competence - Standardsen_US
dc.subject.meshCurriculumen_US
dc.subject.meshEducation, Medical, Undergraduate - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshEducational Measurement - Standardsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshReproducibility Of Resultsen_US
dc.subject.meshSelf-Assessmenten_US
dc.subject.meshSelf-Evaluation Programs - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshStudents, Medical - Psychologyen_US
dc.titleThe interactive examination: Assessing students' self-assessment abilityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMattheos, N: mattheos@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMattheos, N=rp01662en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1365-2923.2004.01788.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid15025639en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-1842784967en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-1842784967&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume38en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage378en_US
dc.identifier.epage389en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000220272400007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMattheos, N=6602862633en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNattestad, A=6701582728en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFalkNilsson, E=6506622587en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAttström, R=7005222726en_US

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