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Book Chapter: International recognition of autonomy for indigenous populations: the case of Tibet

TitleInternational recognition of autonomy for indigenous populations: the case of Tibet
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherAshgate Pub Co
Citation
International recognition of autonomy for indigenous populations: the case of Tibet. In Chen, GB, Offord, B, Garbutt, R (Eds.), Activating Human Rights and Peace: Theories, Practices and Contexts, p. 170-185. UK: Ashgate Pub Co, 2012 How to Cite?
AbstractThis chapter addresses China’s Tibet policy and the claims made about it in relation to international legal standards and practices. At this critical time in a Sino-Tibetan dialogue that has gone on since 2002, a book on activating human rights and peace offers an excellent venue for China and the international community to evaluate various claims and policies and consider a path forward. China’s claims about Tibet have provided a weak foundation for its policies. Emerging international standards concerning the human rights and political autonomy of indigenous ethnic populations may offer a more constructive path forward. Such standards may afford an agreeable alternative to the path of seeking independence that China fears. After the recent decision by the International Court of Justice in the Kosovo case upholding a right to declare independence Chinese anxieties about Tibetan intentions will only increase. Now may be the time for a policy change to pursue an autonomy model more likely to satisfy the Tibetan urge for self-rule in the Chinese context.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/166650
ISBN
SSRN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDavis, MCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:43:39Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:43:39Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational recognition of autonomy for indigenous populations: the case of Tibet. In Chen, GB, Offord, B, Garbutt, R (Eds.), Activating Human Rights and Peace: Theories, Practices and Contexts, p. 170-185. UK: Ashgate Pub Co, 2012en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-1409430766-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/166650-
dc.description.abstractThis chapter addresses China’s Tibet policy and the claims made about it in relation to international legal standards and practices. At this critical time in a Sino-Tibetan dialogue that has gone on since 2002, a book on activating human rights and peace offers an excellent venue for China and the international community to evaluate various claims and policies and consider a path forward. China’s claims about Tibet have provided a weak foundation for its policies. Emerging international standards concerning the human rights and political autonomy of indigenous ethnic populations may offer a more constructive path forward. Such standards may afford an agreeable alternative to the path of seeking independence that China fears. After the recent decision by the International Court of Justice in the Kosovo case upholding a right to declare independence Chinese anxieties about Tibetan intentions will only increase. Now may be the time for a policy change to pursue an autonomy model more likely to satisfy the Tibetan urge for self-rule in the Chinese context.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAshgate Pub Coen_US
dc.relation.ispartofActivating Human Rights and Peace: Theories, Practices and Contextsen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleInternational recognition of autonomy for indigenous populations: the case of Tibeten_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailDavis, MC: mcdavis@hku.hken_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros207078en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros222799-
dc.identifier.spage170en_US
dc.identifier.epage185en_US
dc.publisher.placeUK-
dc.identifier.ssrn2177816-
dc.identifier.hkulrp2012/039-

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