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Conference Paper: Risk of tuberculosis in high-rise and high density dwellings: an exploratory spatial analysis

TitleRisk of tuberculosis in high-rise and high density dwellings: an exploratory spatial analysis
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envpol
Citation
The 2nd Urban Environmental Pollution Conference (UEP 2012), Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 17-20 June 2012. In Environmental Pollution, 2013, v. 183, p. 40-45 How to Cite?
AbstractStudies have shown that socioeconomic and environmental factors have direct/indirect influences on TB. This research focuses on TB prevalence of Hong Kong in relation to its compact urban development comprising of high-rise and high-density residential dwellings caused by rapid population growth and limited land resources. It has been postulated that occupants living on higher levels of a building would benefit from better ventilation and direct sunlight and thus less likely to contract infectious respiratory diseases. On the contrary, those on lower floors amid the dense clusters of high-rises are more susceptible to TB infection because of poorer air quality from street-level pollution and lesser exposure to direct sunlight. However, there have not been published studies to support these claims. As TB continues to threaten public health in Hong Kong, this study seeks to understand the effects of housing development on TB occurrences in an urban setting.
DescriptionUEP 2012 focus on Creating Healthy, Liveable Cities
Poster
Environmental Pollution v. 183 entitled: Selected Papers from Urban Environmental Pollution 2012
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/166346
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.839
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.045
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, PCen_US
dc.contributor.authorLow, CTen_US
dc.contributor.authorTse, CWSen_US
dc.contributor.authorTsui, CKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorHui, PKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:33:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:33:02Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2nd Urban Environmental Pollution Conference (UEP 2012), Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 17-20 June 2012. In Environmental Pollution, 2013, v. 183, p. 40-45en_US
dc.identifier.issn0269-7491-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/166346-
dc.descriptionUEP 2012 focus on Creating Healthy, Liveable Cities-
dc.descriptionPoster-
dc.descriptionEnvironmental Pollution v. 183 entitled: Selected Papers from Urban Environmental Pollution 2012-
dc.description.abstractStudies have shown that socioeconomic and environmental factors have direct/indirect influences on TB. This research focuses on TB prevalence of Hong Kong in relation to its compact urban development comprising of high-rise and high-density residential dwellings caused by rapid population growth and limited land resources. It has been postulated that occupants living on higher levels of a building would benefit from better ventilation and direct sunlight and thus less likely to contract infectious respiratory diseases. On the contrary, those on lower floors amid the dense clusters of high-rises are more susceptible to TB infection because of poorer air quality from street-level pollution and lesser exposure to direct sunlight. However, there have not been published studies to support these claims. As TB continues to threaten public health in Hong Kong, this study seeks to understand the effects of housing development on TB occurrences in an urban setting.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envpol-
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Pollutionen_US
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Environmental Pollution. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Environmental Pollution, 2013, v. 183, p. 40-45. DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2012.11.025-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshGeographic Information Systems-
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshHousing - statistics and numerical data-
dc.subject.meshTuberculosis - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshVentilation - methods - statistics and numerical data-
dc.titleRisk of tuberculosis in high-rise and high density dwellings: an exploratory spatial analysisen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, PC: pclai@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLow, CT: lowe_ctlow@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTse, CWS: tsewsc@ha.org.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTsui, CK: albertcktsui@hotmail.com-
dc.identifier.emailLee, H: leehwh@ha.org.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHui, PK: pkhui@ha.org.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLai, PC=rp00565en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.envpol.2012.11.025-
dc.identifier.pmid23453769-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84874287138-
dc.identifier.hkuros206970en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros207740-
dc.identifier.hkuros213750-
dc.identifier.hkuros246662-
dc.identifier.hkuros246691-
dc.identifier.volume183-
dc.identifier.spage40-
dc.identifier.epage45-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000327367600007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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