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Conference Paper: Negotiating Multilingualism: Return migration and identities in Hong Kong

TitleNegotiating Multilingualism: Return migration and identities in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherFreie Universität Berlin.
Citation
The 19th Sociolinguistics Symposium, Berlin, Germany, 21-24 August 2012 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper reports sociolinguistic and ethnographic research on Hong Kong Chinese who returned to Hong Kong after migrating to an Anglophone country. In investigating this ‘moving population’ during an era of increasing global movements, this project conjoins diverse areas of transnationalism, sociolinguistics and bilingualism, so to erect a knowledge base which attends to local-global articulations and micro-macro sociolinguistic junctures. Investigation of returnee’s linguistic repertoires and practices, their re-adaptation and re-negotiation of identities during their reversion, and ways through which the flexibility of individuals connects to larger regimes of social organization, all inspire fascinating insight into ways in which individuals maneuver in a globalized world where boundaries are constantly crossed. The 2001 Hong Kong census reported that 3.5% of the population (over 240,000 people) were ethnic Chinese holding a foreign passport. This new trend in mobile and flexibile citizenship (cf. Ong 1999) has significantly inspired studies in population research and the social geography of returnees in Hong Kong (Ley & Kobayashi 2005, Sussman 2005, Waters 2005, 2007,2008), but little within linguistics/sociolinguistics domains. This research investigates the micro structurally distinctive styles of code-switching used strategically by these returnee bilinguals, and the mediating language ideologies associated with a macro societal trajectory in post-colonial Hong Kong. Data includes 110 hours of natural speech among a self- forming community of returnees, interviews, and ethnographic observation across six years.
DescriptionConference theme: Language and the City
Poster session: Big Cities - Urban Linguistic Ecologies
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/166182

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, KHYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:29:48Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:29:48Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 19th Sociolinguistics Symposium, Berlin, Germany, 21-24 August 2012en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/166182-
dc.descriptionConference theme: Language and the City-
dc.descriptionPoster session: Big Cities - Urban Linguistic Ecologies-
dc.description.abstractThis paper reports sociolinguistic and ethnographic research on Hong Kong Chinese who returned to Hong Kong after migrating to an Anglophone country. In investigating this ‘moving population’ during an era of increasing global movements, this project conjoins diverse areas of transnationalism, sociolinguistics and bilingualism, so to erect a knowledge base which attends to local-global articulations and micro-macro sociolinguistic junctures. Investigation of returnee’s linguistic repertoires and practices, their re-adaptation and re-negotiation of identities during their reversion, and ways through which the flexibility of individuals connects to larger regimes of social organization, all inspire fascinating insight into ways in which individuals maneuver in a globalized world where boundaries are constantly crossed. The 2001 Hong Kong census reported that 3.5% of the population (over 240,000 people) were ethnic Chinese holding a foreign passport. This new trend in mobile and flexibile citizenship (cf. Ong 1999) has significantly inspired studies in population research and the social geography of returnees in Hong Kong (Ley & Kobayashi 2005, Sussman 2005, Waters 2005, 2007,2008), but little within linguistics/sociolinguistics domains. This research investigates the micro structurally distinctive styles of code-switching used strategically by these returnee bilinguals, and the mediating language ideologies associated with a macro societal trajectory in post-colonial Hong Kong. Data includes 110 hours of natural speech among a self- forming community of returnees, interviews, and ethnographic observation across six years.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherFreie Universität Berlin.-
dc.relation.ispartofSociolinguistics Symposiumen_US
dc.titleNegotiating Multilingualism: Return migration and identities in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChen, KHY: khychen@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChen, KHY=rp01164en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros210358en_US
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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