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Conference Paper: "Worldwide education": a study of English in International Schools

Title"Worldwide education": a study of English in International Schools
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherUniversity of Osaka.
Citation
The 2nd Asian Conference on Language Learning (ACLL2012), Osaka, Japan, 26-28 April 2012. In ACLL Conference Proceedings, 2012, p. 26-34 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper addresses methodological issues that emerge in the study of English as an international language, and argues for a more in-depth analysis of the specific socio-economic factors involved in the process of what is often simplistically regarded as linguistic globalization. The last decades have witnessed fierce debates over the legitimacy of cultural and capitalist imperialism, with one of the main issues concerning the endangerment of local cultures and linguistic identities. Nonetheless, proponents of this approach fail to offer a convincing analysis of key terms such as culture and linguistic identity. This is not to deny the role of (i) historical factors which have led to the recent predominant position of English as an international language, and (ii) the political issues within the linguistic debates surrounding it. Quite the contrary, their repercussions are of primary importance when it comes to locating the diverse linguistic ecologies (Mufwene 2004) in their respective temporal, geographical, economical and social contexts. Altogether, this paper will focus on various components influencing the dynamics of languages in contact. It argues that diglossia (i.e.: languages in competition) is not necessarily prevailing over multilingualism and one does not abandon his identity when learning a new language. In the global context and despite regional proximity, all speakers eventually make linguistic choices according to their specific situation. This paper focuses on exploring the question of representation and language choice, drawing on a study of individuals in international schools where English is in interaction with other languages.
DescriptionTheme: Globalization, Culture and Society: What role does language play?
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/166176
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChriste, Nen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:29:47Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:29:47Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2nd Asian Conference on Language Learning (ACLL2012), Osaka, Japan, 26-28 April 2012. In ACLL Conference Proceedings, 2012, p. 26-34en_US
dc.identifier.issn2186-4691-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/166176-
dc.descriptionTheme: Globalization, Culture and Society: What role does language play?-
dc.description.abstractThis paper addresses methodological issues that emerge in the study of English as an international language, and argues for a more in-depth analysis of the specific socio-economic factors involved in the process of what is often simplistically regarded as linguistic globalization. The last decades have witnessed fierce debates over the legitimacy of cultural and capitalist imperialism, with one of the main issues concerning the endangerment of local cultures and linguistic identities. Nonetheless, proponents of this approach fail to offer a convincing analysis of key terms such as culture and linguistic identity. This is not to deny the role of (i) historical factors which have led to the recent predominant position of English as an international language, and (ii) the political issues within the linguistic debates surrounding it. Quite the contrary, their repercussions are of primary importance when it comes to locating the diverse linguistic ecologies (Mufwene 2004) in their respective temporal, geographical, economical and social contexts. Altogether, this paper will focus on various components influencing the dynamics of languages in contact. It argues that diglossia (i.e.: languages in competition) is not necessarily prevailing over multilingualism and one does not abandon his identity when learning a new language. In the global context and despite regional proximity, all speakers eventually make linguistic choices according to their specific situation. This paper focuses on exploring the question of representation and language choice, drawing on a study of individuals in international schools where English is in interaction with other languages.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Osaka.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofThe Asian Conference on Language Learning Conference Proceedings 2012en_US
dc.title"Worldwide education": a study of English in International Schoolsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChriste, N: h1091011@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros208728en_US
dc.identifier.spage26-
dc.identifier.epage34-
dc.publisher.placeJapan-
dc.description.otherThe 2nd Asian Conference on Language Learning (ACLL2012), Osaka, Japan, 26-28 April 2012. In ACLL Conference Proceedings, 2012, p. 26-34-

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