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Article: Microbial community characteristics of petroleum reservoir production water amended with n-alkanes and incubated under nitrate-, sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions
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TitleMicrobial community characteristics of petroleum reservoir production water amended with n-alkanes and incubated under nitrate-, sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions
 
AuthorsLi, W2
Wang, LY2
Duan, RY2
Liu, JF2
Gu, JD1
Mu, BZ2
 
Keywords16s rrna gene
Actinobacteria
Archaeal
Clone library
Crenarchaeota
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ibiod
 
CitationInternational Biodeterioration and Biodegradation, 2012, v. 69, p. 87-96 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ibiod.2012.01.005
 
AbstractMethanogenic, sulfate- and nitrate-reducing enrichment cultures amended with long-chain n-alkanes (C 15-C 20) were established with production water from Huabei oilfield in China in the present study. Chemical analyses indicated that degradation of n-alkanes was evident under all three conditions after 356 days of incubation. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene amplification indicated that α-, β-, γ-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were detected in the nitrate-reducing enrichment; Actinobacteria, Nitrospira and δ-Proteobacteria were recovered from both the sulfate-reducing and methanogenic enrichments. Actinobacteria and Nitrospira were the most abundant in methanogenic and sulfate-reducing enrichment, respectively. The archaeal clone libraries showed that the order Methanomicrobiales within the phylum Euryarchaeota predominated methanogenic enrichment; whereas the unclassified class Thermoprotei within the phylum Crenarchaeota prevailed in sulfate-reducing enrichment. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences from genomic DNA extracted directly from the petroleum reservoir production water with those from the three active enrichments showed that the available electron acceptors had a strong influence on the microbial community composition. In addition, genes encoding the alkylsuccinate synthase (assA) and methyl coenzyme-M reductase (mcrA) were amplified from the methanogenic enrichment and the results suggested that fumarate addition was probably involved in the degradation of n-alkanes. These results shed light on the potential utilization of microbial metabolism in remediation of hydrocarbon contamination or in enhancing the recovery of residual oil for energy. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
 
ISSN0964-8305
2013 Impact Factor: 2.235
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.884
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ibiod.2012.01.005
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLi, W
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, LY
 
dc.contributor.authorDuan, RY
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, JF
 
dc.contributor.authorGu, JD
 
dc.contributor.authorMu, BZ
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:25:53Z
 
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:25:53Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractMethanogenic, sulfate- and nitrate-reducing enrichment cultures amended with long-chain n-alkanes (C 15-C 20) were established with production water from Huabei oilfield in China in the present study. Chemical analyses indicated that degradation of n-alkanes was evident under all three conditions after 356 days of incubation. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene amplification indicated that α-, β-, γ-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were detected in the nitrate-reducing enrichment; Actinobacteria, Nitrospira and δ-Proteobacteria were recovered from both the sulfate-reducing and methanogenic enrichments. Actinobacteria and Nitrospira were the most abundant in methanogenic and sulfate-reducing enrichment, respectively. The archaeal clone libraries showed that the order Methanomicrobiales within the phylum Euryarchaeota predominated methanogenic enrichment; whereas the unclassified class Thermoprotei within the phylum Crenarchaeota prevailed in sulfate-reducing enrichment. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences from genomic DNA extracted directly from the petroleum reservoir production water with those from the three active enrichments showed that the available electron acceptors had a strong influence on the microbial community composition. In addition, genes encoding the alkylsuccinate synthase (assA) and methyl coenzyme-M reductase (mcrA) were amplified from the methanogenic enrichment and the results suggested that fumarate addition was probably involved in the degradation of n-alkanes. These results shed light on the potential utilization of microbial metabolism in remediation of hydrocarbon contamination or in enhancing the recovery of residual oil for energy. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationInternational Biodeterioration and Biodegradation, 2012, v. 69, p. 87-96 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ibiod.2012.01.005
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10382687
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ibiod.2012.01.005
 
dc.identifier.epage96
 
dc.identifier.hkuros209631
 
dc.identifier.hkuros224966
 
dc.identifier.issn0964-8305
2013 Impact Factor: 2.235
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.884
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862829149
 
dc.identifier.spage87
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/165966
 
dc.identifier.volume69
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ibiod
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Biodeterioration and Biodegradation
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject16s rrna gene
 
dc.subjectActinobacteria
 
dc.subjectArchaeal
 
dc.subjectClone library
 
dc.subjectCrenarchaeota
 
dc.titleMicrobial community characteristics of petroleum reservoir production water amended with n-alkanes and incubated under nitrate-, sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. East China University of Science and Technology