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Article: Terrestrial herpetofaunal assemblages in secondary forests and exotic Lophostemon confertus plantations in South China

TitleTerrestrial herpetofaunal assemblages in secondary forests and exotic Lophostemon confertus plantations in South China
Authors
KeywordsSecondary forest
Amphibian
Exotic plantation
Forest regeneration
Reptile
Secondary forests
Issue Date2012
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foreco
Citation
Forest Ecology and Management, 2012, v. 270, p. 71-77 How to Cite?
AbstractDeforestation is one of the major causes of biodiversity loss. Globally, large areas of primary forest have been replaced by secondary forests and plantations, and changes in tree species composition have often led to alteration of plant and animal communities that were associated with those primary forests. Hong Kong has experienced a long history of deforestation and may be one of the pioneers in using exotic tree plantations for forest restoration in Asia. In this study, we sampled herpetofaunal assemblages in native, secondary forests and exotic Lophostemon confertus plantations by transect surveys, pitfall traps, and coverboards. Amphibians were more abundant in secondary forests than in plantations, while the abundance of reptiles and species compositions of both amphibians and reptiles were similar in both forest types. Body condition of the most common reptile, Sphenomorphus indicus (Indian forest skink), was similar between secondary forests and plantations. However, higher proportions of S. indicus exhibited autotomized or missing tails in secondary forests than in plantations, which may be related to higher percentages of rock and wood cover on the forest floor potentially increasing the chance of escape from predators in secondary forests. Secondary forests may provide a better habitat for herpetofauna, we suggest that planting of a mixture of native tree species and thinning of exotic trees may be favorable management efforts to enhance biodiversity in future plantation in South China. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/165951
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.826
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.749
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSung, YHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarraker, NEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHau, BCHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:25:47Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:25:47Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationForest Ecology and Management, 2012, v. 270, p. 71-77en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0378-1127en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/165951-
dc.description.abstractDeforestation is one of the major causes of biodiversity loss. Globally, large areas of primary forest have been replaced by secondary forests and plantations, and changes in tree species composition have often led to alteration of plant and animal communities that were associated with those primary forests. Hong Kong has experienced a long history of deforestation and may be one of the pioneers in using exotic tree plantations for forest restoration in Asia. In this study, we sampled herpetofaunal assemblages in native, secondary forests and exotic Lophostemon confertus plantations by transect surveys, pitfall traps, and coverboards. Amphibians were more abundant in secondary forests than in plantations, while the abundance of reptiles and species compositions of both amphibians and reptiles were similar in both forest types. Body condition of the most common reptile, Sphenomorphus indicus (Indian forest skink), was similar between secondary forests and plantations. However, higher proportions of S. indicus exhibited autotomized or missing tails in secondary forests than in plantations, which may be related to higher percentages of rock and wood cover on the forest floor potentially increasing the chance of escape from predators in secondary forests. Secondary forests may provide a better habitat for herpetofauna, we suggest that planting of a mixture of native tree species and thinning of exotic trees may be favorable management efforts to enhance biodiversity in future plantation in South China. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/forecoen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofForest Ecology and Managementen_HK
dc.subjectSecondary foresten_HK
dc.subjectAmphibianen_HK
dc.subjectExotic plantationen_HK
dc.subjectForest regenerationen_HK
dc.subjectReptileen_HK
dc.subjectSecondary forestsen_HK
dc.titleTerrestrial herpetofaunal assemblages in secondary forests and exotic Lophostemon confertus plantations in South Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSung, YH: heisyh@gmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarraker, NE: karraker@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHau, BCH: chhau@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityKarraker, NE=rp00714en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHau, BCH=rp00703en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.foreco.2012.01.011en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84856809058en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros209464en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84856809058&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume270en_HK
dc.identifier.spage71en_HK
dc.identifier.epage77en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000302986900009-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHau, BCH=6701358580en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarraker, NE=8708421900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSung, YH=54967212200en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike10348805-

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