File Download
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Does cervical disc arthroplasty reduce adjacent segment disease and other complications in comparison to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion? A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

TitleDoes cervical disc arthroplasty reduce adjacent segment disease and other complications in comparison to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion? A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherSICOT 2011
Citation
The 25th Triennial World Congress (SICOT 2011), Prague, Czech Republic, 6-9 September 2011. In Abstract Book, SICOT 2011 How to Cite?
AbstractINTRODUCTION: To reduce the risk of adjacent segment disease and other procedure-related complications following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) has been advocated forone-level cervical disc disease. However, it remains unknown whether CDA decreases the occurrence of such complications. As such, the following study addressed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of CDA in reducing adjacent segment disease and other complications in comparison to ACDF. METHODS: Three reviewers performed a literature search for randomized controlled trials comparing CDA to ACDF for radiculopathy and/or myelopathy for one-level cervical disc disease. Studies with 2 years or greater follow-up were selected. Adjacent segment disease, secondary surgery (i.e. revision, reoperation, instrumentation/graft removal), and adverse events were assessed and pooled for analyses. RESULTS: Three studies were included for review. Due to limitations with study design, studies presented with Level II evidence. CDA exhibited a 49% decrease risk for reoperation attributed to adjacent segment disease, but was not statistically significant (OR: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.23-1.10). Additional procedure-related complications did not statistically differ between groups (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: At two-year follow-up, CDA does not significantly reduce the risk of adjacent segment disease and other complications in comparison to ACDF. Due to the lack of blinding and relatively high withdrawal/drop-out rates among studies, robust conclusions supporting the advocacy of CDA over ACDF are not warranted at this stage. High-quality studies are needed to properly assess the true efficacy of such interventions.
DescriptionFree Papers: Spine ‐ Arthroplasty & Trauma: abstract no. 29653
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/165513

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorVavken, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorModi, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorLuk, Ken_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:19:18Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:19:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 25th Triennial World Congress (SICOT 2011), Prague, Czech Republic, 6-9 September 2011. In Abstract Book, SICOT 2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/165513-
dc.descriptionFree Papers: Spine ‐ Arthroplasty & Trauma: abstract no. 29653-
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: To reduce the risk of adjacent segment disease and other procedure-related complications following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) has been advocated forone-level cervical disc disease. However, it remains unknown whether CDA decreases the occurrence of such complications. As such, the following study addressed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of CDA in reducing adjacent segment disease and other complications in comparison to ACDF. METHODS: Three reviewers performed a literature search for randomized controlled trials comparing CDA to ACDF for radiculopathy and/or myelopathy for one-level cervical disc disease. Studies with 2 years or greater follow-up were selected. Adjacent segment disease, secondary surgery (i.e. revision, reoperation, instrumentation/graft removal), and adverse events were assessed and pooled for analyses. RESULTS: Three studies were included for review. Due to limitations with study design, studies presented with Level II evidence. CDA exhibited a 49% decrease risk for reoperation attributed to adjacent segment disease, but was not statistically significant (OR: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.23-1.10). Additional procedure-related complications did not statistically differ between groups (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: At two-year follow-up, CDA does not significantly reduce the risk of adjacent segment disease and other complications in comparison to ACDF. Due to the lack of blinding and relatively high withdrawal/drop-out rates among studies, robust conclusions supporting the advocacy of CDA over ACDF are not warranted at this stage. High-quality studies are needed to properly assess the true efficacy of such interventions.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSICOT 2011-
dc.relation.ispartof25th Triennial World Congress, SICOT 2011en_US
dc.titleDoes cervical disc arthroplasty reduce adjacent segment disease and other complications in comparison to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion? A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trialsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailSamartzis, D: dspine@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailModi, H: hnm7678@yahoo.co.inen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, K: cheungmc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLuk, K: hcm21000@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySamartzis, D=rp01430en_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, K=rp00387en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, K=rp00333en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros208417en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros255993-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 130514-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats