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Article: Prevalence and impacts of poor sleep on quality of life and associated factor of good sleepers in a sample of older Chinese adults

TitlePrevalence and impacts of poor sleep on quality of life and associated factor of good sleepers in a sample of older Chinese adults
Authors
KeywordsChinese
Educational status
Emotionality
Gender
Interview
Issue Date2012
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hqlo.com/home/
Citation
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 2012, v. 10 n. 1, article 72 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Sleep disturbance is a complex health problem in ageing global populations decreasing quality of life among many older people. Geographic, cultural, and ethnic differences in sleep patterns have been documented within and between Western and Asian populations. The aim of this study was to explore sleep problems among Hong Kong seniors by examining the prevalence of poor sleep quality, the relationship between sleep quality and health-related quality of life, and associated factors of good sleepers in different age groups. METHODS: This cross-sectional study used convenience sampling and gathered data during face-to-face interviews. Older community-dwelling individuals (n = 301) were recruited in community centres in 2010. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 were used to measure sleep quality and health-related quality of life. The Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 domain scores were compared between good and bad sleepers and between long and short sleepers using Hotelling's T-Square test. SF-36 domain scores were placed into a logistic regression model that controlled for significant demographic variables (gender, educational level, perceived health). RESULTS: Most (77.7%) participants were poor sleepers. Participants who had global Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores <5 and slept >/=5.5 h/night had better health-related quality of life. Vitality, emotional role, physical functioning, and bodily pain domain scores were associated factors of good sleepers in different age groups. CONCLUSIONS: This study found a strong negative association between sleep deprivation (poor quality, short duration) and health-related quality of life. Associated factors for good sleep quality in later life differ among age groups in relation to universal age-related changes, and should be addressed by social policies and health-care programmes.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/165481
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.212
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.020
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, CMHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, PH-
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:18:56Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:18:56Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationHealth and Quality of Life Outcomes, 2012, v. 10 n. 1, article 72en_US
dc.identifier.issn1477-7525-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/165481-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Sleep disturbance is a complex health problem in ageing global populations decreasing quality of life among many older people. Geographic, cultural, and ethnic differences in sleep patterns have been documented within and between Western and Asian populations. The aim of this study was to explore sleep problems among Hong Kong seniors by examining the prevalence of poor sleep quality, the relationship between sleep quality and health-related quality of life, and associated factors of good sleepers in different age groups. METHODS: This cross-sectional study used convenience sampling and gathered data during face-to-face interviews. Older community-dwelling individuals (n = 301) were recruited in community centres in 2010. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 were used to measure sleep quality and health-related quality of life. The Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 domain scores were compared between good and bad sleepers and between long and short sleepers using Hotelling's T-Square test. SF-36 domain scores were placed into a logistic regression model that controlled for significant demographic variables (gender, educational level, perceived health). RESULTS: Most (77.7%) participants were poor sleepers. Participants who had global Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores <5 and slept >/=5.5 h/night had better health-related quality of life. Vitality, emotional role, physical functioning, and bodily pain domain scores were associated factors of good sleepers in different age groups. CONCLUSIONS: This study found a strong negative association between sleep deprivation (poor quality, short duration) and health-related quality of life. Associated factors for good sleep quality in later life differ among age groups in relation to universal age-related changes, and should be addressed by social policies and health-care programmes.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hqlo.com/home/-
dc.relation.ispartofHealth and Quality of Life Outcomesen_US
dc.rightsHealth and Quality of Life Outcomes. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectChinese-
dc.subjectEducational status-
dc.subjectEmotionality-
dc.subjectGender-
dc.subjectInterview-
dc.titlePrevalence and impacts of poor sleep on quality of life and associated factor of good sleepers in a sample of older Chinese adultsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLo, CMH: meihan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, PH: paulhlee@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLo, MH=rp01360en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1477-7525-10-72-
dc.identifier.pmid22709334-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3445836-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862262032-
dc.identifier.hkuros210753en_US
dc.identifier.volume10en_US
dc.identifier.issue1, article 72-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000309140000001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.citeulike10804299-

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