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Conference Paper: Anti-obesity drugs - are they underused in the United States?

TitleAnti-obesity drugs - are they underused in the United States?
Authors
KeywordsCardiovascular disease
Issue Date2011
PublisherHong Kong College of Cardiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkcchk.com/journals.php#3
Citation
The 15th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Medicine (ICSM), Hong Kong, 17 September 2011. In Journal of the Hong Kong College of Cardiology, 2011, v. 19 n. 2, p. 69, abstract no. OC3 How to Cite?
AbstractINTRODUCTION: Obesity is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. We analysed the use of anti-obesity drugs in the United States in recent years. METHODS: We included 5332 (2630 men and 2702 women) participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2008. We studied their demographic data, body mass index (BMI), and their weight and drug histories. Candidates were eligible for anti-obesity drugs if their BMI > 30.0 kg/m2, or BMI > 27.0 kg/m2 in the presence of one or more risk factors (hypertension, diabetes or dyslipidemia). RESULTS: 45.9% men and 45.0% women were eligible to take anti-obesity drugs. Although 85.1% knew they were overweight and 90.1% desired to lose weight, only 0.6% were on drugs during the previous month. 0.5% were on phentermine and 0.1% on orlistat. None were on sibutramine. During the preceding year, 2.2% took prescription drugs and 3.7% took nonprescription drugs to control weight. Furthermore, among eligible participants, only 61.9% changed their diet and 36.5% exercised to control weight. CONCLUSIONS: Although obesity is highly prevalent, anti-obesity drug use was very low in the United States. This indicates that the withdrawal of sibutramine in 2010 would not have a large impact. More widespread changes in lifestyle are needed. Anti-obesity drugs should be considered for those who do not respond to lifestyle changes alone.
DescriptionOral Communications
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/165430
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.102

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, NRen_US
dc.contributor.authorOng, KLen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, RYHen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:18:12Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:18:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 15th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Medicine (ICSM), Hong Kong, 17 September 2011. In Journal of the Hong Kong College of Cardiology, 2011, v. 19 n. 2, p. 69, abstract no. OC3en_US
dc.identifier.issn1027-7811-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/165430-
dc.descriptionOral Communications-
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Obesity is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. We analysed the use of anti-obesity drugs in the United States in recent years. METHODS: We included 5332 (2630 men and 2702 women) participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2008. We studied their demographic data, body mass index (BMI), and their weight and drug histories. Candidates were eligible for anti-obesity drugs if their BMI > 30.0 kg/m2, or BMI > 27.0 kg/m2 in the presence of one or more risk factors (hypertension, diabetes or dyslipidemia). RESULTS: 45.9% men and 45.0% women were eligible to take anti-obesity drugs. Although 85.1% knew they were overweight and 90.1% desired to lose weight, only 0.6% were on drugs during the previous month. 0.5% were on phentermine and 0.1% on orlistat. None were on sibutramine. During the preceding year, 2.2% took prescription drugs and 3.7% took nonprescription drugs to control weight. Furthermore, among eligible participants, only 61.9% changed their diet and 36.5% exercised to control weight. CONCLUSIONS: Although obesity is highly prevalent, anti-obesity drug use was very low in the United States. This indicates that the withdrawal of sibutramine in 2010 would not have a large impact. More widespread changes in lifestyle are needed. Anti-obesity drugs should be considered for those who do not respond to lifestyle changes alone.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHong Kong College of Cardiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkcchk.com/journals.php#3-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Hong Kong College of Cardiologyen_US
dc.subjectCardiovascular disease-
dc.titleAnti-obesity drugs - are they underused in the United States?en_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, NR: h1094072@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailOng, KL: okl2000@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, RYH: yhleung@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY: mycheung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros208477en_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage69en_US
dc.identifier.epage69en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-
dc.description.otherThe 15th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Medicine (ICSM), Hong Kong, 17 September 2011. In Journal of the Hong Kong College of Cardiology, 2011, v. 19 n. 2, p. 69, abstract no. OC3-

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