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Article: Changes in suicide rates following media reports on celebrity suicide: A meta-analysis
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TitleChanges in suicide rates following media reports on celebrity suicide: A meta-analysis
 
AuthorsNiederkrotenthaler, T4
Fu, KW3
Yip, PSF3
Fong, DYT1
Stack, S2
Cheng, Q3
Pirkis, J5
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/
 
CitationJournal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2012, v. 66 n. 11, p. 1037-1042 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech-2011-200707
 
AbstractBackground: A growing number of studies indicate that sensationalist reporting of suicide is associated with increases in suicide rates, but in the light of some negative findings, the issue has remained controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the best current evidence on the association between celebrity suicide stories and subsequent suicides. Methods: Literature searches of six data sources (Medline, Psychlit, Communication Abstracts, Education Resources Information Center, Dissertation Abstracts and Australian Public Affairs Database (APAIS)) were conducted. Studies were included if they (1) adopted an ecological design, (2) focused on celebrity suicide, (3) had completed suicide as outcome variable, (4) analysed suicide rates across all suicide methods, (5) used data from after World War II and (6) satisfied basic quality criteria. Results: 10 studies with totally 98 suicides by celebrities met the criteria. The pooled estimate indicated a change in suicide rates (suicides per 100 000 population) of 0.26 (95% CI 0.09 to 0.43) in the month after a celebrity suicide. There was substantial heterogeneity between studies, which was explained by the type of celebrity (entertainment elite vs others) and the region of study, as indicated by mixed-effects meta-regression. The region-of-studyespecific effect of reporting a suicide by an entertainment celebrity was 0.64 (95% CI 0.55 to 0.73) in North America, 0.58 (95% CI 0.47 to 0.68) in Asia, 0.36 (95% CI --0.10 to 0.61) in Australia and 0.68 (95% CI 0.51 to 0.85) in Europe. There was no indication of publication bias. Conclusions: Reports on celebrity suicide are associated with increases in suicides. Study region and celebrity type appear to have an impact on the effect size.
 
ISSN0143-005X
2013 Impact Factor: 3.294
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech-2011-200707
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorNiederkrotenthaler, T
 
dc.contributor.authorFu, KW
 
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSF
 
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYT
 
dc.contributor.authorStack, S
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Q
 
dc.contributor.authorPirkis, J
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:11:36Z
 
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:11:36Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: A growing number of studies indicate that sensationalist reporting of suicide is associated with increases in suicide rates, but in the light of some negative findings, the issue has remained controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the best current evidence on the association between celebrity suicide stories and subsequent suicides. Methods: Literature searches of six data sources (Medline, Psychlit, Communication Abstracts, Education Resources Information Center, Dissertation Abstracts and Australian Public Affairs Database (APAIS)) were conducted. Studies were included if they (1) adopted an ecological design, (2) focused on celebrity suicide, (3) had completed suicide as outcome variable, (4) analysed suicide rates across all suicide methods, (5) used data from after World War II and (6) satisfied basic quality criteria. Results: 10 studies with totally 98 suicides by celebrities met the criteria. The pooled estimate indicated a change in suicide rates (suicides per 100 000 population) of 0.26 (95% CI 0.09 to 0.43) in the month after a celebrity suicide. There was substantial heterogeneity between studies, which was explained by the type of celebrity (entertainment elite vs others) and the region of study, as indicated by mixed-effects meta-regression. The region-of-studyespecific effect of reporting a suicide by an entertainment celebrity was 0.64 (95% CI 0.55 to 0.73) in North America, 0.58 (95% CI 0.47 to 0.68) in Asia, 0.36 (95% CI --0.10 to 0.61) in Australia and 0.68 (95% CI 0.51 to 0.85) in Europe. There was no indication of publication bias. Conclusions: Reports on celebrity suicide are associated with increases in suicides. Study region and celebrity type appear to have an impact on the effect size.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2012, v. 66 n. 11, p. 1037-1042 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech-2011-200707
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech-2011-200707
 
dc.identifier.eissn1470-2738
 
dc.identifier.epage1042
 
dc.identifier.hkuros211117
 
dc.identifier.issn0143-005X
2013 Impact Factor: 3.294
 
dc.identifier.issue11
 
dc.identifier.pmid22523342
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84868660687
 
dc.identifier.spage1037
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164877
 
dc.identifier.volume66
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.titleChanges in suicide rates following media reports on celebrity suicide: A meta-analysis
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Fong, DYT</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Stack, S</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Cheng, Q</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Pirkis, J</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. Wayne State University
  3. The University of Hong Kong
  4. Medizinische Universitat Wien
  5. University of Melbourne