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Article: Obstructive lung disease does not increase lung cancer mortality among female never-smokers in Hong Kong
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TitleObstructive lung disease does not increase lung cancer mortality among female never-smokers in Hong Kong
 
AuthorsLeung, CC2
Lam, TH1
Yew, WW3
Law, WS2
Tam, CM2
Chang, KC2
McGhee, S2
Tam, SY2
Chan, KF2
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherInternational Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.theunion.org/about-the-journal/about-the-journal.html
 
CitationInternational Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2012, v. 16 n. 4, p. 546-552 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5588/ijtld.11.0573
 
AbstractSETTING: High lung cancer mortality is observed among female never-smokers in Hong Kong. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between obstructive lung disease (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and/or asthma) and lung cancer mortality by sex and smoking status. DESIGN: A cohort of elderly clients (aged >/=65 years) in a health maintenance programme were followed prospectively through linkage with the territory-wide death registry for causes of death, using identity card number as the unique identifier. RESULTS: After 516,055 person-years of follow-up, respectively 1297, 872 and 1908 deaths were caused by lung cancer, other tobacco-related malignancies and non-tobacco-related malignancies. In the overall analysis, obstructive lung disease was independently associated with mortality due to lung cancer (aHR 1.86, P < 0.001) after adjustment for potential confounders. However, no association was detected among female never-smokers (HR 0.97, P = 0.909), in sharp contrast with female ever-smokers, male never-smokers and male ever-smokers (HR 1.98, 2.34 and 2.09, respectively, P from 0.047 to <0.001). Consistent results were observed after exclusion of all deaths in the initial 3 years. CONCLUSION: Obstructive lung disease exerted differential effects on lung cancer mortality across different sex and smoking subgroups in this Asian population, with a conspicuous absence of effect among female never-smokers.
 
DescriptionDOI: Free content
 
ISSN1027-3719
2013 Impact Factor: 2.756
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.527
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.5588/ijtld.11.0573
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000302336300022
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CC
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH
 
dc.contributor.authorYew, WW
 
dc.contributor.authorLaw, WS
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, CM
 
dc.contributor.authorChang, KC
 
dc.contributor.authorMcGhee, S
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, SY
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, KF
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:09:39Z
 
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:09:39Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractSETTING: High lung cancer mortality is observed among female never-smokers in Hong Kong. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between obstructive lung disease (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and/or asthma) and lung cancer mortality by sex and smoking status. DESIGN: A cohort of elderly clients (aged >/=65 years) in a health maintenance programme were followed prospectively through linkage with the territory-wide death registry for causes of death, using identity card number as the unique identifier. RESULTS: After 516,055 person-years of follow-up, respectively 1297, 872 and 1908 deaths were caused by lung cancer, other tobacco-related malignancies and non-tobacco-related malignancies. In the overall analysis, obstructive lung disease was independently associated with mortality due to lung cancer (aHR 1.86, P < 0.001) after adjustment for potential confounders. However, no association was detected among female never-smokers (HR 0.97, P = 0.909), in sharp contrast with female ever-smokers, male never-smokers and male ever-smokers (HR 1.98, 2.34 and 2.09, respectively, P from 0.047 to <0.001). Consistent results were observed after exclusion of all deaths in the initial 3 years. CONCLUSION: Obstructive lung disease exerted differential effects on lung cancer mortality across different sex and smoking subgroups in this Asian population, with a conspicuous absence of effect among female never-smokers.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.descriptionDOI: Free content
 
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2012, v. 16 n. 4, p. 546-552 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5588/ijtld.11.0573
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.5588/ijtld.11.0573
 
dc.identifier.epage552
 
dc.identifier.hkuros206458
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000302336300022
 
dc.identifier.issn1027-3719
2013 Impact Factor: 2.756
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.527
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.pmid22325953
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84858634454
 
dc.identifier.spage546
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164793
 
dc.identifier.volume16
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherInternational Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.theunion.org/about-the-journal/about-the-journal.html
 
dc.publisher.placeFrance
 
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
 
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. Copyright © International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease.
 
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics and numerical data
 
dc.subject.meshAsthma - complications
 
dc.subject.meshLung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
 
dc.subject.meshPulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - complications
 
dc.subject.meshSmoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
 
dc.titleObstructive lung disease does not increase lung cancer mortality among female never-smokers in Hong Kong
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<item><contributor.author>Leung, CC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lam, TH</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yew, WW</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Law, WS</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tam, CM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chang, KC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>McGhee, S</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tam, SY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, KF</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-09-20T08:09:39Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2012-09-20T08:09:39Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2012</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2012, v. 16 n. 4, p. 546-552</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>1027-3719</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/164793</identifier.uri>
<description>DOI: Free content</description>
<description.abstract>SETTING: High lung cancer mortality is observed among female never-smokers in Hong Kong. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between obstructive lung disease (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and/or asthma) and lung cancer mortality by sex and smoking status. DESIGN: A cohort of elderly clients (aged &gt;/=65 years) in a health maintenance programme were followed prospectively through linkage with the territory-wide death registry for causes of death, using identity card number as the unique identifier. RESULTS: After 516,055 person-years of follow-up, respectively 1297, 872 and 1908 deaths were caused by lung cancer, other tobacco-related malignancies and non-tobacco-related malignancies. In the overall analysis, obstructive lung disease was independently associated with mortality due to lung cancer (aHR 1.86, P &lt; 0.001) after adjustment for potential confounders. However, no association was detected among female never-smokers (HR 0.97, P = 0.909), in sharp contrast with female ever-smokers, male never-smokers and male ever-smokers (HR 1.98, 2.34 and 2.09, respectively, P from 0.047 to &lt;0.001). Consistent results were observed after exclusion of all deaths in the initial 3 years. CONCLUSION: Obstructive lung disease exerted differential effects on lung cancer mortality across different sex and smoking subgroups in this Asian population, with a conspicuous absence of effect among female never-smokers.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.theunion.org/about-the-journal/about-the-journal.html</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease</relation.ispartof>
<rights>International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. Copyright &#169; International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease.</rights>
<subject.mesh>Asian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics and numerical data</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Asthma - complications</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - complications</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology</subject.mesh>
<title>Obstructive lung disease does not increase lung cancer mortality among female never-smokers in Hong Kong</title>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. TB and Chest Service
  3. Grantham Hospital Hong Kong