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Article: Climate change, food shortage and war: a quantitative case study in China during 1500-1800

TitleClimate change, food shortage and war: a quantitative case study in China during 1500-1800
Authors
KeywordsChina
Climate Change
Food Shortage
War
Issue Date2010
PublisherThe Egyptian Society for Environmental Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://eses-catrina.com/index.php?category=3
Citation
Catrina: the international journal of environmental sciences, 2010, v. 5 n. 1, p. 63-71 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough global warming and its future possible consequences for human societies have been thoroughly examined in recent years, quantitative studies about the notable effects of climate changes upon human societies in history are almost absent. Recently, the authors scientifically explored the relationship between climate change and wars by comparing high-resolution paleo-climate reconstructions with known war incidences in history. They found that in most of the geographic regions worldwide war frequencies showed a cyclic pattern that closely followed the paleo-temperature changes. In this research, the authors proposed a conceptual model to exemplify how climatic fluctuations are translated into war peace cycles via socio-economic mechanism, with China during 1500 – 1800 to be a case study. The model was quantitatively verified by time series analysis and Pearson’s correlation analysis. Statistical results confirmed that, cooling impeded agricultural production brought about a series of social problems including food price inflation, then successively war outbreak, famine and population decline. The findings indicate that war-peace, population and price cycles in agrarian societies in recent centuries have been driven mainly by long-term climate change, which may challenge those socio-economic theories about historical cycles, human demography and wars. The observed temperature-war relationship may give some indication of future societal impacts from climate warming.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164770
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, DDen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, HFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:09:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:09:20Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationCatrina: the international journal of environmental sciences, 2010, v. 5 n. 1, p. 63-71en_US
dc.identifier.issn1687-5052-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164770-
dc.description.abstractAlthough global warming and its future possible consequences for human societies have been thoroughly examined in recent years, quantitative studies about the notable effects of climate changes upon human societies in history are almost absent. Recently, the authors scientifically explored the relationship between climate change and wars by comparing high-resolution paleo-climate reconstructions with known war incidences in history. They found that in most of the geographic regions worldwide war frequencies showed a cyclic pattern that closely followed the paleo-temperature changes. In this research, the authors proposed a conceptual model to exemplify how climatic fluctuations are translated into war peace cycles via socio-economic mechanism, with China during 1500 – 1800 to be a case study. The model was quantitatively verified by time series analysis and Pearson’s correlation analysis. Statistical results confirmed that, cooling impeded agricultural production brought about a series of social problems including food price inflation, then successively war outbreak, famine and population decline. The findings indicate that war-peace, population and price cycles in agrarian societies in recent centuries have been driven mainly by long-term climate change, which may challenge those socio-economic theories about historical cycles, human demography and wars. The observed temperature-war relationship may give some indication of future societal impacts from climate warming.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Egyptian Society for Environmental Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://eses-catrina.com/index.php?category=3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofCatrina: the international journal of environmental sciencesen_US
dc.subjectChina-
dc.subjectClimate Change-
dc.subjectFood Shortage-
dc.subjectWar-
dc.titleClimate change, food shortage and war: a quantitative case study in China during 1500-1800en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhang, DD: zhangd@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, HF: harry.lee@graduate.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, DD=rp00649en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, HF=rp00646en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros206460en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros196937-
dc.identifier.volume5en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage63en_US
dc.identifier.epage71en_US
dc.publisher.placeEgypt-

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