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Article: Kiloyear-scale climate events and evolution during the Last Interglacial, Mu Us Desert, China
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TitleKiloyear-scale climate events and evolution during the Last Interglacial, Mu Us Desert, China
 
AuthorsDu, S3
Li, B1 4
Chen, M3
Zhang, DD2
Xiang, Rong3
Niu, D1
Wen, X1
Ou, X5
 
KeywordsAir mass
Eemian
High pressure
Ice core
Interglacial
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/quaint
 
CitationQuaternary International, 2012, v. 263, p. 63-70 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2012.01.004
 
AbstractThe fifth segment of the Milanggouwan stratigraphical section (MGS 5) in the Mu Us Desert provides high-resolution geological information on environmental variations during the Last Interglacial. The analysis of grain content (<50μm), organic content, SiO 2, Al 2O 3, TOFe, and SiO 2-(Al 2O 3+TOFe) ratios in the MGS 5 suggest that there were 17 kiloyear-scale climate fluctuations in the Last Interglacial, including 9 warm events (W1-W9) and 8 cold events (C1-C8), dominated by the East Asian summer monsoon and winter monsoon respectively. The analysis also suggests that the Eemian interglacial was unstable, with 3 warm events (W7-W9) and 2 cold events (C7-C8), indicating that climate fluctuations affected the East Asian monsoon in the Mu Us Desert during the Last Interglacial. The change cycles and the nature of the kiloyear-scale climate events have a close temporal relationship with the Greenland ice-core oxygen isotope data, suggesting that the climate forming mechanism was affected by polar weather, North Atlantic sea ice, range of the Eurasian ice front, and movement of the Arctic frontal, all of which affect the intensity of the Siberian-Mongolian high pressure region through the movement of the cold air mass. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.
 
ISSN1040-6182
2013 Impact Factor: 2.128
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.067
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2012.01.004
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorDu, S
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, B
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, M
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, DD
 
dc.contributor.authorXiang, Rong
 
dc.contributor.authorNiu, D
 
dc.contributor.authorWen, X
 
dc.contributor.authorOu, X
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:09:19Z
 
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:09:19Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractThe fifth segment of the Milanggouwan stratigraphical section (MGS 5) in the Mu Us Desert provides high-resolution geological information on environmental variations during the Last Interglacial. The analysis of grain content (<50μm), organic content, SiO 2, Al 2O 3, TOFe, and SiO 2-(Al 2O 3+TOFe) ratios in the MGS 5 suggest that there were 17 kiloyear-scale climate fluctuations in the Last Interglacial, including 9 warm events (W1-W9) and 8 cold events (C1-C8), dominated by the East Asian summer monsoon and winter monsoon respectively. The analysis also suggests that the Eemian interglacial was unstable, with 3 warm events (W7-W9) and 2 cold events (C7-C8), indicating that climate fluctuations affected the East Asian monsoon in the Mu Us Desert during the Last Interglacial. The change cycles and the nature of the kiloyear-scale climate events have a close temporal relationship with the Greenland ice-core oxygen isotope data, suggesting that the climate forming mechanism was affected by polar weather, North Atlantic sea ice, range of the Eurasian ice front, and movement of the Arctic frontal, all of which affect the intensity of the Siberian-Mongolian high pressure region through the movement of the cold air mass. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.
 
dc.identifier.citationQuaternary International, 2012, v. 263, p. 63-70 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2012.01.004
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10249658
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2012.01.004
 
dc.identifier.epage70
 
dc.identifier.hkuros206100
 
dc.identifier.issn1040-6182
2013 Impact Factor: 2.128
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.067
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862804583
 
dc.identifier.spage63
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164766
 
dc.identifier.volume263
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/quaint
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofQuaternary International
 
dc.subjectAir mass
 
dc.subjectEemian
 
dc.subjectHigh pressure
 
dc.subjectIce core
 
dc.subjectInterglacial
 
dc.titleKiloyear-scale climate events and evolution during the Last Interglacial, Mu Us Desert, China
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Chen, M</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zhang, DD</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Xiang, Rong</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Niu, D</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wen, X</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ou, X</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-09-20T08:09:19Z</date.accessioned>
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<description.abstract>The fifth segment of the Milanggouwan stratigraphical section (MGS 5) in the Mu Us Desert provides high-resolution geological information on environmental variations during the Last Interglacial. The analysis of grain content (&lt;50&#956;m), organic content, SiO 2, Al 2O 3, TOFe, and SiO 2-(Al 2O 3+TOFe) ratios in the MGS 5 suggest that there were 17 kiloyear-scale climate fluctuations in the Last Interglacial, including 9 warm events (W1-W9) and 8 cold events (C1-C8), dominated by the East Asian summer monsoon and winter monsoon respectively. The analysis also suggests that the Eemian interglacial was unstable, with 3 warm events (W7-W9) and 2 cold events (C7-C8), indicating that climate fluctuations affected the East Asian monsoon in the Mu Us Desert during the Last Interglacial. The change cycles and the nature of the kiloyear-scale climate events have a close temporal relationship with the Greenland ice-core oxygen isotope data, suggesting that the climate forming mechanism was affected by polar weather, North Atlantic sea ice, range of the Eurasian ice front, and movement of the Arctic frontal, all of which affect the intensity of the Siberian-Mongolian high pressure region through the movement of the cold air mass. &#169; 2012 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. South China Normal University
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. South China Seas Institute of Oceanography Chinese Academy of Sciences
  4. Chinese Academy of Sciences
  5. Jiaying University