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Article: How you think about your intelligence determines how you feel in school: the role of theories of intelligence on academic emotions

TitleHow you think about your intelligence determines how you feel in school: the role of theories of intelligence on academic emotions
Authors
KeywordsAchievement emotions
Achievement goals
Implicit theories of intelligence
Issue Date2012
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/lindif
Citation
Learning and Individual Differences, 2012, v. 22 n. 6, p. 814-819 How to Cite?
AbstractResearch on implicit theories of intelligence and academic emotions have proceeded in parallel with little cross-over of ideas. This study aims to examine the potential synergies that may exist between these two strands of research by examining whether implicit theories of intelligence can function as a predictor of academic emotions when situated within Pekrun's (2006) control-value theory of achievement emotions. Filipino secondary school students (N = 1147) participated in the study. Hierarchical regression analyses were employed to investigate the predictive effects of implicit theories of intelligence on academic emotions after controlling for the variance accounted for by demographic variables, social environmental factors, and achievement goals which have been identified as important antecedents in previous research. Results indicated that holding an entity theory of intelligence positively predicted negative emotions such as anger, anxiety, shame, hopelessness, and boredom. However, it was not significantly related to the positive emotions of enjoyment, hope, and pride. The usefulness of these findings for integrating theorizing in the implicit theories of intelligence and academic emotions literature is discussed. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164708
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.631
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.057
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKing, RBen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcInerney, DMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWatkins, DAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:08:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:08:07Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationLearning and Individual Differences, 2012, v. 22 n. 6, p. 814-819en_US
dc.identifier.issn1041-6080-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164708-
dc.description.abstractResearch on implicit theories of intelligence and academic emotions have proceeded in parallel with little cross-over of ideas. This study aims to examine the potential synergies that may exist between these two strands of research by examining whether implicit theories of intelligence can function as a predictor of academic emotions when situated within Pekrun's (2006) control-value theory of achievement emotions. Filipino secondary school students (N = 1147) participated in the study. Hierarchical regression analyses were employed to investigate the predictive effects of implicit theories of intelligence on academic emotions after controlling for the variance accounted for by demographic variables, social environmental factors, and achievement goals which have been identified as important antecedents in previous research. Results indicated that holding an entity theory of intelligence positively predicted negative emotions such as anger, anxiety, shame, hopelessness, and boredom. However, it was not significantly related to the positive emotions of enjoyment, hope, and pride. The usefulness of these findings for integrating theorizing in the implicit theories of intelligence and academic emotions literature is discussed. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/lindifen_US
dc.relation.ispartofLearning and Individual Differencesen_US
dc.subjectAchievement emotions-
dc.subjectAchievement goals-
dc.subjectImplicit theories of intelligence-
dc.titleHow you think about your intelligence determines how you feel in school: the role of theories of intelligence on academic emotionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKing, RB: ronnel.king@gmail.comen_US
dc.identifier.emailWatkins, DA: hrfewda@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.lindif.2012.04.005-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84868303159-
dc.identifier.hkuros211018en_US
dc.identifier.volume22-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage814-
dc.identifier.epage819-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000312683900019-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.citeulike10682698-

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