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Article: Hardiness and thinking styles: Implications for higher education

TitleHardiness and thinking styles: Implications for higher education
Authors
KeywordsHardiness
Thinking styles
Higher education
Issue Date2011
PublisherSpringer Publishing Company. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springerpub.com/journal.aspx?jid=1945-8959
Citation
Journal of Cognitive Education and Psychology, 2011, v. 10 n. 3, p. 294-307 How to Cite?
AbstractThe principal objective of this study was to investigate the predictive power of thinking styles for hardiness—a healthy personality disposition. Four hundred (146 males and 254 females) students from a large, comprehensive university in Shanghai, the People's Republic of China, responded to the Thinking Styles Inventory-Revised II (Sternberg, Wagner, & Zhang, 2007) and the hardiness scale (Bartone, Ursano, Wright, & Ingraham, 1989). Results showed that after students' age and gender were controlled for, creativity-generating styles (also known as Type I styles) and a style that allows students to work in collaboration with others (i.e., external style) positively contributed to hardiness, whereas norm-favoring styles (also known as Type II styles) and a style that denotes a lack of discipline and planning (i.e., anarchic style) negatively contributed to hardiness. Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to university students, faculty members, and for university senior managers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164691
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, LFen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, YHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:08:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:08:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Cognitive Education and Psychology, 2011, v. 10 n. 3, p. 294-307en_US
dc.identifier.issn1945-8959-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164691-
dc.description.abstractThe principal objective of this study was to investigate the predictive power of thinking styles for hardiness—a healthy personality disposition. Four hundred (146 males and 254 females) students from a large, comprehensive university in Shanghai, the People's Republic of China, responded to the Thinking Styles Inventory-Revised II (Sternberg, Wagner, & Zhang, 2007) and the hardiness scale (Bartone, Ursano, Wright, & Ingraham, 1989). Results showed that after students' age and gender were controlled for, creativity-generating styles (also known as Type I styles) and a style that allows students to work in collaboration with others (i.e., external style) positively contributed to hardiness, whereas norm-favoring styles (also known as Type II styles) and a style that denotes a lack of discipline and planning (i.e., anarchic style) negatively contributed to hardiness. Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to university students, faculty members, and for university senior managers.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Publishing Company. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springerpub.com/journal.aspx?jid=1945-8959en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Cognitive Education and Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectHardiness-
dc.subjectThinking styles-
dc.subjectHigher education-
dc.titleHardiness and thinking styles: Implications for higher educationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhang, LF: lfzhang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, LF=rp00988en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros209153en_US
dc.identifier.volume10en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage294en_US
dc.identifier.epage307en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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