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Article: Expo 2010 Shanghai China: a signature chapter of the Huangpu Riverfronts Trilogy

TitleExpo 2010 Shanghai China: a signature chapter of the Huangpu Riverfronts Trilogy
Authors
KeywordsDualism
Expo 2010 Shanghai China
Mega-event led renewal
Pre-post
The Huangpu Riverfronts Trilogy
Regeneration
Issue Date2012
PublisherEmerald Group Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/info/journals/jpmd/jpmd.jsp
Citation
Journal of Place Management and Development, 2012, v. 5 n. 2, p. 174-191 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose - Over decades, mega-events have enjoyed increasing global popularity as catalysts of significant urban renewal both on and beyond the event grounds. Nevertheless, although some mega-events are exemplary in their transformation of some places, post-event failure of others highlight a lack of long-range planning. Yet, such a paradoxical relationship between spectacularity and sustainability has, so far, received little in-depth analysis. Building upon the Yin-Yang theory, the purpose of this paper is to identify the Triple-C gap and argues that planning for mega-event led renewals (MELRs) is an issue of dualism rather than dichotomy. Design/methodology/approach - This paper adopts the multiple-case study approach. Two methodological steps are taken to seek a greater understanding of the issue at global and local scales. One is a review of eight mega-event cases in the West to identify post-event sustainability challenges. The other explores these challenges through an examination of the Expo 2010 development as a chapter of the Huangpu Riverfronts Renewal in Shanghai China. Findings - The eight historical cases and Expo 2010 unanimously challenge the dichotomy between event staging and post-event sustainability. It is therefore high time for future client organizations to rethink how to find a convergence. Practical implications - With lessons drawn, the article concludes that planning an MELR should be pre-post oriented and serve as a catalyst for broader-scale improvements. Originality/value - This pioneering study constitutes a much-needed reference for future mega-event hosts to rethink their commitment to MELDs, which will hopefully spark more interdisciplinary interest.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164579
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.802

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDeng, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorPoon, SWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:06:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:06:19Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Place Management and Development, 2012, v. 5 n. 2, p. 174-191en_US
dc.identifier.issn1753-8335-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164579-
dc.description.abstractPurpose - Over decades, mega-events have enjoyed increasing global popularity as catalysts of significant urban renewal both on and beyond the event grounds. Nevertheless, although some mega-events are exemplary in their transformation of some places, post-event failure of others highlight a lack of long-range planning. Yet, such a paradoxical relationship between spectacularity and sustainability has, so far, received little in-depth analysis. Building upon the Yin-Yang theory, the purpose of this paper is to identify the Triple-C gap and argues that planning for mega-event led renewals (MELRs) is an issue of dualism rather than dichotomy. Design/methodology/approach - This paper adopts the multiple-case study approach. Two methodological steps are taken to seek a greater understanding of the issue at global and local scales. One is a review of eight mega-event cases in the West to identify post-event sustainability challenges. The other explores these challenges through an examination of the Expo 2010 development as a chapter of the Huangpu Riverfronts Renewal in Shanghai China. Findings - The eight historical cases and Expo 2010 unanimously challenge the dichotomy between event staging and post-event sustainability. It is therefore high time for future client organizations to rethink how to find a convergence. Practical implications - With lessons drawn, the article concludes that planning an MELR should be pre-post oriented and serve as a catalyst for broader-scale improvements. Originality/value - This pioneering study constitutes a much-needed reference for future mega-event hosts to rethink their commitment to MELDs, which will hopefully spark more interdisciplinary interest.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/info/journals/jpmd/jpmd.jsp-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Place Management and Developmenten_US
dc.subjectDualism-
dc.subjectExpo 2010 Shanghai China-
dc.subjectMega-event led renewal-
dc.subjectPre-post-
dc.subjectThe Huangpu Riverfronts Trilogy-
dc.subjectRegeneration-
dc.titleExpo 2010 Shanghai China: a signature chapter of the Huangpu Riverfronts Trilogyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailDeng, Y: ydeng@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPoon, SW: swpoon@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPoon, SW=rp01017en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/17538331211250062-
dc.identifier.hkuros209822en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros214645-
dc.identifier.volume5en_US
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage174-
dc.identifier.epage191-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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