File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Prescription drug use in pregnancy: more evidence of safety is needed

TitlePrescription drug use in pregnancy: more evidence of safety is needed
Authors
KeywordsAntidepressants
Anti-epileptic drugs
Congenital malformation
Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency
US Food and Drug Administration
Issue Date2012
PublisherRoyal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinetog.org
Citation
The Obstetrician & Gynaecologist, 2012, v. 14 n. 2, p. 87-92 How to Cite?
AbstractKey content: Prescription drug use during pregnancy is prevalent, with 44–99% of women being prescribed medication during pregnancy. Pregnant women and their unborn children are considered a vulnerable population; recent public health scares, such as H1N1, have highlighted the need for more detailed research into medication use in pregnancy. The teratogenic risk of more than 80% of 468 drugs released in the USA over the last 20 years remains to be clarified. Maternal physiological changes during pregnancy can alter drug pharmacokinetics, with poorly understood effects, while placental transfer of medications may have unknown fetal consequences. There is an urgent need for further research into the adverse effects of drugs used in pregnancy. Learning objectives: To know about the prevalence of prescription medication use during pregnancy. To be aware of the lack of safety data available on fetal adverse effects for commonly prescribed drugs. Ethical issues: Drug companies are reluctant to carry out phase III clinical trials in pregnant women and they rely on animal models and post-marketing surveillance for the identification of adverse effects. Is it unethical to prescribe drugs in pregnancy for which there is little concrete safety data?
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164489
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICKen_US
dc.contributor.authorSutcliffe, AGen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:00:21Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:00:21Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Obstetrician & Gynaecologist, 2012, v. 14 n. 2, p. 87-92en_US
dc.identifier.issn1467-2561-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/164489-
dc.description.abstractKey content: Prescription drug use during pregnancy is prevalent, with 44–99% of women being prescribed medication during pregnancy. Pregnant women and their unborn children are considered a vulnerable population; recent public health scares, such as H1N1, have highlighted the need for more detailed research into medication use in pregnancy. The teratogenic risk of more than 80% of 468 drugs released in the USA over the last 20 years remains to be clarified. Maternal physiological changes during pregnancy can alter drug pharmacokinetics, with poorly understood effects, while placental transfer of medications may have unknown fetal consequences. There is an urgent need for further research into the adverse effects of drugs used in pregnancy. Learning objectives: To know about the prevalence of prescription medication use during pregnancy. To be aware of the lack of safety data available on fetal adverse effects for commonly prescribed drugs. Ethical issues: Drug companies are reluctant to carry out phase III clinical trials in pregnant women and they rely on animal models and post-marketing surveillance for the identification of adverse effects. Is it unethical to prescribe drugs in pregnancy for which there is little concrete safety data?-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoyal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinetog.org-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Obstetrician & Gynaecologisten_US
dc.subjectAntidepressants-
dc.subjectAnti-epileptic drugs-
dc.subjectCongenital malformation-
dc.subjectMedicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency-
dc.subjectUS Food and Drug Administration-
dc.titlePrescription drug use in pregnancy: more evidence of safety is neededen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK: wongick@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1744-4667.2012.00096.x-
dc.identifier.hkuros207225en_US
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage87en_US
dc.identifier.epage92en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats