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Article: Giant Mesozoic gold provinces related to the destruction of the North China craton
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TitleGiant Mesozoic gold provinces related to the destruction of the North China craton
 
AuthorsLi, JW2
Bi, SJ2
Selby, D1
Chen, L2
Vasconcelos, P3
Thiede, D3
Zhou, MF4
Zhao, XF4
Li, ZK2
Qiu, HN5
 
KeywordsLithospheric destruction
Lode gold
Mantle-derived fluids
North china craton
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/epsl
 
CitationEarth and Planetary Science Letters, 2012, v. 349, p. 26-37 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2012.06.058
 
AbstractLode gold deposits in Precambrian cratons represent the world's major gold source and were mostly generated during formation and stabilization of the cratons. However, there is an extraordinary exception in the North China craton (NCC), where lode gold deposits formed after prolonged stabilization of the craton. Molybdenite Re-Os and hydrothermal sericite and biotite 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of major gold deposits from the Xiaoqinling district, southern NCC, bracket their emplacement in the range of 154.1±1.1 to 118.9±1.2Ma (n=23), postdating formation of the craton by more than 1.7 billion years. Fluid inclusions extracted from gold-bearing pyrite have elevated 3He/ 4He ratios (1.52-0.22Ra) and mantle-like Ne isotopes ( 20Ne/ 22Ne=10.02-9.22 and 21Ne/ 22Ne=0.033-0.027), indicating presence of mantle-derived fluids in the ore system. Measured δ 34S of pyrite and δD and δ 18O of hydrothermal micas and fluid inclusion waters in auriferous quartz further confirm a magmatic/mantle source for sulfur and ore fluids. Gold deposits of similar ages also widely occur in the eastern and northern margins of the NCC, which, together with those in the Xiaoqinling district, have a total reserve of 2500t gold, forming the only known giant late Mesozoic gold province in the world's Precambrian cratons. These deposits formed coevally with extensive felsic to mafic magmatism, development of intracontinental rift basins, and exhumation of metamorphic core complexes across the eastern NCC, events interpreted as indicating thinning and destruction of the lithosphere beneath the craton. Rising of asthenosphere coupled with destruction of the lithosphere has generated voluminous mafic and felsic magmas that provided sufficient fluids, sulfur and, by inference, other ore components to form the giant gold provinces. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.
 
ISSN0012-821X
2013 Impact Factor: 4.724
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2012.06.058
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLi, JW
 
dc.contributor.authorBi, SJ
 
dc.contributor.authorSelby, D
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, L
 
dc.contributor.authorVasconcelos, P
 
dc.contributor.authorThiede, D
 
dc.contributor.authorZhou, MF
 
dc.contributor.authorZhao, XF
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, ZK
 
dc.contributor.authorQiu, HN
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-18T03:33:51Z
 
dc.date.available2012-09-18T03:33:51Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractLode gold deposits in Precambrian cratons represent the world's major gold source and were mostly generated during formation and stabilization of the cratons. However, there is an extraordinary exception in the North China craton (NCC), where lode gold deposits formed after prolonged stabilization of the craton. Molybdenite Re-Os and hydrothermal sericite and biotite 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of major gold deposits from the Xiaoqinling district, southern NCC, bracket their emplacement in the range of 154.1±1.1 to 118.9±1.2Ma (n=23), postdating formation of the craton by more than 1.7 billion years. Fluid inclusions extracted from gold-bearing pyrite have elevated 3He/ 4He ratios (1.52-0.22Ra) and mantle-like Ne isotopes ( 20Ne/ 22Ne=10.02-9.22 and 21Ne/ 22Ne=0.033-0.027), indicating presence of mantle-derived fluids in the ore system. Measured δ 34S of pyrite and δD and δ 18O of hydrothermal micas and fluid inclusion waters in auriferous quartz further confirm a magmatic/mantle source for sulfur and ore fluids. Gold deposits of similar ages also widely occur in the eastern and northern margins of the NCC, which, together with those in the Xiaoqinling district, have a total reserve of 2500t gold, forming the only known giant late Mesozoic gold province in the world's Precambrian cratons. These deposits formed coevally with extensive felsic to mafic magmatism, development of intracontinental rift basins, and exhumation of metamorphic core complexes across the eastern NCC, events interpreted as indicating thinning and destruction of the lithosphere beneath the craton. Rising of asthenosphere coupled with destruction of the lithosphere has generated voluminous mafic and felsic magmas that provided sufficient fluids, sulfur and, by inference, other ore components to form the giant gold provinces. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationEarth and Planetary Science Letters, 2012, v. 349, p. 26-37 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2012.06.058
 
dc.identifier.citeulike11231437
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2012.06.058
 
dc.identifier.epage37
 
dc.identifier.hkuros206534
 
dc.identifier.issn0012-821X
2013 Impact Factor: 4.724
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84864413361
 
dc.identifier.spage26
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163633
 
dc.identifier.volume349
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/epsl
 
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
 
dc.relation.ispartofEarth and Planetary Science Letters
 
dc.subjectLithospheric destruction
 
dc.subjectLode gold
 
dc.subjectMantle-derived fluids
 
dc.subjectNorth china craton
 
dc.titleGiant Mesozoic gold provinces related to the destruction of the North China craton
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Bi, SJ</contributor.author>
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<contributor.author>Chen, L</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Vasconcelos, P</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Thiede, D</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zhou, MF</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zhao, XF</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Li, ZK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Qiu, HN</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Lode gold deposits in Precambrian cratons represent the world&apos;s major gold source and were mostly generated during formation and stabilization of the cratons. However, there is an extraordinary exception in the North China craton (NCC), where lode gold deposits formed after prolonged stabilization of the craton. Molybdenite Re-Os and hydrothermal sericite and biotite 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of major gold deposits from the Xiaoqinling district, southern NCC, bracket their emplacement in the range of 154.1&#177;1.1 to 118.9&#177;1.2Ma (n=23), postdating formation of the craton by more than 1.7 billion years. Fluid inclusions extracted from gold-bearing pyrite have elevated 3He/ 4He ratios (1.52-0.22Ra) and mantle-like Ne isotopes ( 20Ne/ 22Ne=10.02-9.22 and 21Ne/ 22Ne=0.033-0.027), indicating presence of mantle-derived fluids in the ore system. Measured &#948; 34S of pyrite and &#948;D and &#948; 18O of hydrothermal micas and fluid inclusion waters in auriferous quartz further confirm a magmatic/mantle source for sulfur and ore fluids. Gold deposits of similar ages also widely occur in the eastern and northern margins of the NCC, which, together with those in the Xiaoqinling district, have a total reserve of 2500t gold, forming the only known giant late Mesozoic gold province in the world&apos;s Precambrian cratons. These deposits formed coevally with extensive felsic to mafic magmatism, development of intracontinental rift basins, and exhumation of metamorphic core complexes across the eastern NCC, events interpreted as indicating thinning and destruction of the lithosphere beneath the craton. Rising of asthenosphere coupled with destruction of the lithosphere has generated voluminous mafic and felsic magmas that provided sufficient fluids, sulfur and, by inference, other ore components to form the giant gold provinces. &#169; 2012 Elsevier B.V.</description.abstract>
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<subject>Lode gold</subject>
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Author Affiliations
  1. University of Durham
  2. China University of Geosciences
  3. University of Queensland
  4. The University of Hong Kong
  5. Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry Chinese Academy of Sciences