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Article: May I have your consent? Informed consent in clinical trials- feasibility in emergency situations

TitleMay I have your consent? Informed consent in clinical trials- feasibility in emergency situations
Authors
KeywordsConsent
Psychiatric emergency
Emergency
Issue Date2011
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=JPI
Citation
Journal of Psychiatric Intensive Care, 2011, v. 7 n. 2, p. 109-113 How to Cite?
AbstractClinical researchers in acute emergency settings are commonly faced with the difficulty of satisfying the conventional ethical requirement of obtaining informed consent, whilst ensuring a representative group of patients is recruited into studies. We discuss our own experience in addressing institutional ethical requirements to obtain informed consent in a multi-centre trial, recruiting highly agitated patients in the emergency setting in Melbourne, Australia. We suggest that, through the application of existing ethical and legal frameworks and pre-emptive communication with the key stakeholders in ethics committees, hospital insurers and legal representatives, a balance can be struck between ethical and legal requirements on the one hand, and the integrity of the research question, on the other.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163626
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, EWY-
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, DM-
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, GA-
dc.contributor.authorCastle, DJ-
dc.contributor.authorKnott, JC-
dc.contributor.authorKong, DCM-
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-14T03:31:38Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-14T03:31:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Psychiatric Intensive Care, 2011, v. 7 n. 2, p. 109-113-
dc.identifier.issn1742-6464-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/163626-
dc.description.abstractClinical researchers in acute emergency settings are commonly faced with the difficulty of satisfying the conventional ethical requirement of obtaining informed consent, whilst ensuring a representative group of patients is recruited into studies. We discuss our own experience in addressing institutional ethical requirements to obtain informed consent in a multi-centre trial, recruiting highly agitated patients in the emergency setting in Melbourne, Australia. We suggest that, through the application of existing ethical and legal frameworks and pre-emptive communication with the key stakeholders in ethics committees, hospital insurers and legal representatives, a balance can be struck between ethical and legal requirements on the one hand, and the integrity of the research question, on the other.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=JPI-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Psychiatric Intensive Care-
dc.rightsJournal of Psychiatric Intensive Care. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectConsent-
dc.subjectPsychiatric emergency-
dc.subjectEmergency-
dc.titleMay I have your consent? Informed consent in clinical trials- feasibility in emergency situationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, EWY: ewchan@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1742646411000094-
dc.identifier.hkuros218710-
dc.identifier.volume7-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage109-
dc.identifier.epage113-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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