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Article: Reproducing spaces of Chinese urbanisation: New city-based and land-centred urban transformation

TitleReproducing spaces of Chinese urbanisation: New city-based and land-centred urban transformation
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherSage Publications Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://usj.sagepub.com/
Citation
Urban Studies, 2007, v. 44 n. 9, p. 1827-1855 How to Cite?
AbstractChina's spaces of urbanisation in the 1980s and early 1990s were occupied primarily by the interests of rural industrialisation and town development. Since the mid 1990s, China's urban spaces have been reproduced through a city-based and land-centred process of urbanisation in which large cities managed to reassert their leading positions in an increasingly competitive, globalising and urbanising economy. This study analyses changes in China's non-agricultural land in relation to the growth and structural changes of Chinese cities. A systematic analysis of three sets of data reveals a high intensity and great unevenness of non-agricultural land use in the country. China had 29.5 million hectares of non-agricultural land in 1996, which accounted for only 3 per cent of the national land mass. Over 80 per cent of the recent increase in non-agricultural land use was caused by the expansion of urban and rural settlements, industrialisation and numerous 'development zones'. A comparative analysis of land use data and Landsat images identifies two concurrent processes of urbanisation and non-agricultural land use change. Rapid urban sprawl of large cities, driven by the expansion of ring-roads and setting up of 'development zones', has contributed to the conversion of farmland into non-agricultural uses. At the same time, rural industrialisation and a housing boom have given rise to a dispersed pattern of non-agricultural land development all over the country. Given the pervasive influence of the forces of continuing urbanisation and globalisation, the state's attempt to protect China's dwindling farmland will not reverse the trend of increasing non-agricultural land use, but are likely to slow the pace of land conversion. Anecdotal evidence such as 'hollow villages' and idle land in numerous encircled 'development zones' suggests that there exist ways for China to use its non-agricultural land more efficiently and economically than hitherto.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157887
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.934
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.567
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, GCSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:56:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:56:09Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationUrban Studies, 2007, v. 44 n. 9, p. 1827-1855en_US
dc.identifier.issn0042-0980en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157887-
dc.description.abstractChina's spaces of urbanisation in the 1980s and early 1990s were occupied primarily by the interests of rural industrialisation and town development. Since the mid 1990s, China's urban spaces have been reproduced through a city-based and land-centred process of urbanisation in which large cities managed to reassert their leading positions in an increasingly competitive, globalising and urbanising economy. This study analyses changes in China's non-agricultural land in relation to the growth and structural changes of Chinese cities. A systematic analysis of three sets of data reveals a high intensity and great unevenness of non-agricultural land use in the country. China had 29.5 million hectares of non-agricultural land in 1996, which accounted for only 3 per cent of the national land mass. Over 80 per cent of the recent increase in non-agricultural land use was caused by the expansion of urban and rural settlements, industrialisation and numerous 'development zones'. A comparative analysis of land use data and Landsat images identifies two concurrent processes of urbanisation and non-agricultural land use change. Rapid urban sprawl of large cities, driven by the expansion of ring-roads and setting up of 'development zones', has contributed to the conversion of farmland into non-agricultural uses. At the same time, rural industrialisation and a housing boom have given rise to a dispersed pattern of non-agricultural land development all over the country. Given the pervasive influence of the forces of continuing urbanisation and globalisation, the state's attempt to protect China's dwindling farmland will not reverse the trend of increasing non-agricultural land use, but are likely to slow the pace of land conversion. Anecdotal evidence such as 'hollow villages' and idle land in numerous encircled 'development zones' suggests that there exist ways for China to use its non-agricultural land more efficiently and economically than hitherto.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://usj.sagepub.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofUrban Studiesen_US
dc.titleReproducing spaces of Chinese urbanisation: New city-based and land-centred urban transformationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLin, GCS:gcslin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLin, GCS=rp00609en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00420980701426673en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34548387090en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros150901-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34548387090&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume44en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage1827en_US
dc.identifier.epage1855en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000249416900010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, GCS=7401699741en_US

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