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Article: Asynchronous Holocene climatic change across China

TitleAsynchronous Holocene climatic change across China
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/yqres
Citation
Quaternary Research, 2004, v. 61 n. 1, p. 52-63 How to Cite?
AbstractA review of Holocene climatic variations in different parts of China shows that they were asynchronous. Proxy data from ice cores, pollen, loess, lacustrine sediments, and changes of sea and lake levels demonstrate that many warm and cold oscillations have occurred in China during the Holocene, including a most important climatic event known as the "Holocene optimum," a milder and wetter period, and that the duration and amplitude of the optimum period, as well as its start and end times, differed in different parts of China. Uplift of the Tibetan plateau over the past millions of years led to the development of the monsoon climate and to complex atmospheric circulation over continental China during the Holocene. As a result, the Holocene optimum began and terminated earlier in high-altitude regions of western China than at lower elevations in eastern China, and the amplitude of the variations was lower in the east. This suggests that the western higher-altitude areas were more sensitive to climatic change than were the eastern lower-altitude areas. Holocene climatic records in the Dunde and Guliya ice cores do not correspond. Inverse δ 18O variations between the two cores indicate that the effects of climate and atmospheric processes on the stable isotopes at the two sites differed. The correlation between the isotopic composition of carbonates in lake deposits in western China and climatic variations is similar to that in the ice cores. The climatic resolution in ice cores and lake sediments is higher than that in other media. The lack of precise correspondence of climatic records constructed on the basis of proxy data from different parts of China is a result of the different locations and elevations of the sampling sites, the different resolutions of the source material, and the varied climatic conditions within China. Further work is needed to confirm both the conclusions and the inferences presented here. © 2003 University of Washington. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157862
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.198
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.317
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHe, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorTheakstone, WHen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorYao, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorShen, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorPang, Hen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:56:01Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:56:01Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationQuaternary Research, 2004, v. 61 n. 1, p. 52-63en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-5894en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/157862-
dc.description.abstractA review of Holocene climatic variations in different parts of China shows that they were asynchronous. Proxy data from ice cores, pollen, loess, lacustrine sediments, and changes of sea and lake levels demonstrate that many warm and cold oscillations have occurred in China during the Holocene, including a most important climatic event known as the "Holocene optimum," a milder and wetter period, and that the duration and amplitude of the optimum period, as well as its start and end times, differed in different parts of China. Uplift of the Tibetan plateau over the past millions of years led to the development of the monsoon climate and to complex atmospheric circulation over continental China during the Holocene. As a result, the Holocene optimum began and terminated earlier in high-altitude regions of western China than at lower elevations in eastern China, and the amplitude of the variations was lower in the east. This suggests that the western higher-altitude areas were more sensitive to climatic change than were the eastern lower-altitude areas. Holocene climatic records in the Dunde and Guliya ice cores do not correspond. Inverse δ 18O variations between the two cores indicate that the effects of climate and atmospheric processes on the stable isotopes at the two sites differed. The correlation between the isotopic composition of carbonates in lake deposits in western China and climatic variations is similar to that in the ice cores. The climatic resolution in ice cores and lake sediments is higher than that in other media. The lack of precise correspondence of climatic records constructed on the basis of proxy data from different parts of China is a result of the different locations and elevations of the sampling sites, the different resolutions of the source material, and the varied climatic conditions within China. Further work is needed to confirm both the conclusions and the inferences presented here. © 2003 University of Washington. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/yqresen_US
dc.relation.ispartofQuaternary Researchen_US
dc.titleAsynchronous Holocene climatic change across Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhang, D: zhangd@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, D=rp00649en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.yqres.2003.08.004en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-1542287931en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros90375-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-1542287931&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume61en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage52en_US
dc.identifier.epage63en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000189112500006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHe, Y=37045507600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTheakstone, WH=7003836274en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhonglin, Z=24315111800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDian, Z=9732911600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTandong, Y=7401886289en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTuo, C=37045783500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYongping, S=6505764738en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHongxi, P=6504126798en_US

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