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Article: Short-term effects of hygiene education for preschool (kindergarten) children: a clinical study.
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TitleShort-term effects of hygiene education for preschool (kindergarten) children: a clinical study.
 
AuthorsRamseier, CA1
Leiggener, I1
Lang, NP1
Bagramian, RA1
Inglehart, MR1
 
Issue Date2007
 
PublisherQuintessence Publishing Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.quintessencepublishing.co.uk/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=3&products_id=239
 
CitationOral Health & Preventive Dentistry, 2007, v. 5 n. 1, p. 19-24 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractAIM: To evaluate the outcomes of short (15 minutes) oral hygiene vs. hand hygiene education for preschool children 4 weeks after these interventions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-one preschool children (age range 4-6 years) attending four kindergarten classes participated in a 15-minute health education programme on the importance of body cleanliness for general health. In addition, specific instructions on oral hygiene were provided for two randomly selected classes (30 children), while the remaining two classes (31 children) were given instruction of hand and nail cleaning. The oral hygiene status was assessed usingthe plaque control record (PCR). The cleanliness of the hands and fingernails was determined using a hand hygiene index (HHI) and a nail hygiene index (NHI). All three parameters were assessed before the intervention as well as 4 weeks thereafter. RESULTS: Four weeks after education, the PCR had improved for all children from 79.95% to 72.35% (p < 0.001). The NHI had improved from 74.91% to 61.71% (p < 0.001). In addition, the mean PCR of the children given oral hygiene instruction decreased from 83.67% to 72.40%, while the mean PCR of the children given hand and nail cleaning instruction decreased from 76.23% to 72.29% (interaction effect 'time x type of instruction': p = 0.044). Girls' PCR improved significantly more than boys' PCR (Girls, 80.98 vs. 69.71; boys, 78.33 vs. 75.31; p = 0.021). CONCLUSIONS: The results of the study show that even a short, school-based educational intervention at an early age may affect children's oral health promotion significantly. Teachers should, therefore, be encouraged to educate children from an early age about oral hygiene promotion.
 
ISSN1602-1622
2013 Impact Factor: 0.532
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.369
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorRamseier, CA
 
dc.contributor.authorLeiggener, I
 
dc.contributor.authorLang, NP
 
dc.contributor.authorBagramian, RA
 
dc.contributor.authorInglehart, MR
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:25:25Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:25:25Z
 
dc.date.issued2007
 
dc.description.abstractAIM: To evaluate the outcomes of short (15 minutes) oral hygiene vs. hand hygiene education for preschool children 4 weeks after these interventions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-one preschool children (age range 4-6 years) attending four kindergarten classes participated in a 15-minute health education programme on the importance of body cleanliness for general health. In addition, specific instructions on oral hygiene were provided for two randomly selected classes (30 children), while the remaining two classes (31 children) were given instruction of hand and nail cleaning. The oral hygiene status was assessed usingthe plaque control record (PCR). The cleanliness of the hands and fingernails was determined using a hand hygiene index (HHI) and a nail hygiene index (NHI). All three parameters were assessed before the intervention as well as 4 weeks thereafter. RESULTS: Four weeks after education, the PCR had improved for all children from 79.95% to 72.35% (p < 0.001). The NHI had improved from 74.91% to 61.71% (p < 0.001). In addition, the mean PCR of the children given oral hygiene instruction decreased from 83.67% to 72.40%, while the mean PCR of the children given hand and nail cleaning instruction decreased from 76.23% to 72.29% (interaction effect 'time x type of instruction': p = 0.044). Girls' PCR improved significantly more than boys' PCR (Girls, 80.98 vs. 69.71; boys, 78.33 vs. 75.31; p = 0.021). CONCLUSIONS: The results of the study show that even a short, school-based educational intervention at an early age may affect children's oral health promotion significantly. Teachers should, therefore, be encouraged to educate children from an early age about oral hygiene promotion.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationOral Health & Preventive Dentistry, 2007, v. 5 n. 1, p. 19-24 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage24
 
dc.identifier.issn1602-1622
2013 Impact Factor: 0.532
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.369
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.pmid17366757
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34147122485
 
dc.identifier.spage19
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154452
 
dc.identifier.volume5
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherQuintessence Publishing Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.quintessencepublishing.co.uk/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=3&products_id=239
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofOral health & preventive dentistry
 
dc.subject.meshChild
 
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool
 
dc.subject.meshDental Plaque Index
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHandwashing
 
dc.subject.meshHealth Education
 
dc.subject.meshHealth Education, Dental
 
dc.subject.meshHealth Promotion
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshNails
 
dc.subject.meshOral Hygiene
 
dc.subject.meshSex Factors
 
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome
 
dc.titleShort-term effects of hygiene education for preschool (kindergarten) children: a clinical study.
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<item><contributor.author>Ramseier, CA</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Leiggener, I</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lang, NP</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Bagramian, RA</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Inglehart, MR</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-08-08T08:25:25Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2012-08-08T08:25:25Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2007</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Oral Health &amp; Preventive Dentistry, 2007, v. 5 n. 1, p. 19-24</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>1602-1622</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/154452</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>AIM: To evaluate the outcomes of short (15 minutes) oral hygiene vs. hand hygiene education for preschool children 4 weeks after these interventions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-one preschool children (age range 4-6 years) attending four kindergarten classes participated in a 15-minute health education programme on the importance of body cleanliness for general health. In addition, specific instructions on oral hygiene were provided for two randomly selected classes (30 children), while the remaining two classes (31 children) were given instruction of hand and nail cleaning. The oral hygiene status was assessed usingthe plaque control record (PCR). The cleanliness of the hands and fingernails was determined using a hand hygiene index (HHI) and a nail hygiene index (NHI). All three parameters were assessed before the intervention as well as 4 weeks thereafter. RESULTS: Four weeks after education, the PCR had improved for all children from 79.95% to 72.35% (p &lt; 0.001). The NHI had improved from 74.91% to 61.71% (p &lt; 0.001). In addition, the mean PCR of the children given oral hygiene instruction decreased from 83.67% to 72.40%, while the mean PCR of the children given hand and nail cleaning instruction decreased from 76.23% to 72.29% (interaction effect &apos;time x type of instruction&apos;: p = 0.044). Girls&apos; PCR improved significantly more than boys&apos; PCR (Girls, 80.98 vs. 69.71; boys, 78.33 vs. 75.31; p = 0.021). CONCLUSIONS: The results of the study show that even a short, school-based educational intervention at an early age may affect children&apos;s oral health promotion significantly. Teachers should, therefore, be encouraged to educate children from an early age about oral hygiene promotion.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Quintessence Publishing Co Ltd. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.quintessencepublishing.co.uk/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=3&amp;products_id=239</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Oral health &amp; preventive dentistry</relation.ispartof>
<subject.mesh>Child</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Child, Preschool</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Dental Plaque Index</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Female</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Handwashing</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Health Education</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Health Education, Dental</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Health Promotion</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Humans</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Male</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Nails</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Oral Hygiene</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Sex Factors</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Treatment Outcome</subject.mesh>
<title>Short-term effects of hygiene education for preschool (kindergarten) children: a clinical study.</title>
<type>Article</type>
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<identifier.pmid>17366757</identifier.pmid>
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<identifier.epage>24</identifier.epage>
<publisher.place>United Kingdom</publisher.place>
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Author Affiliations
  1. University Michigan Ann Arbor