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Article: Micromorphological investigation of noncarious cervical lesions treated with demineralizing agents

TitleMicromorphological investigation of noncarious cervical lesions treated with demineralizing agents
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherQuintessence Publishing Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.quintessencepublishing.co.uk/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=3&products_id=243
Citation
Journal Of Adhesive Dentistry, 2000, v. 2 n. 4, p. 279-287 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the micromorphology of noncarious cervical lesions (NCCL) and the change occurring after acid conditioning. Materials and Methods: Nine wedge-shaped lesions, 9 saucer-shaped lesions, and 5 third molars with prepared cervical cavities were used. All NCCLs exhibited a hard, smooth surface with no discoloration. The teeth were sectioned and divided into three groups, each containing the three lesion types. Teeth in Group I were not etched, and teeth in Groups II and III were etched with 35% phosphoric acid and 20% polyacrylic acidβ% aluminum chloride, respectively. Field emission SEM and atomic force microscopy were used to examine the lesion surfaces. Results: The surfaces of the prepared cervical (control) lesions were covered with a smear layer. Treatment with phosphoric acid and polyacrylic acid resulted in removal of the smear layer, although some residual smear layer was found on the surface treated with polyacrylic acid. The images of the untreated surfaces of NCCL showed highly mineralized dentin with complete obliteration of the dentinal tubules. After treatment with phosphoric and polyacrylic acids, the images revealed demineralization of the surface, which was more pronounced on those treated with phosphoric acid. Conclusion: The mineral deposits on the surface of NCCL decreased the effect of acid conditioning. Although there was no apparent difference between the two forms of NCCL used in this study, further work is needed to better understand these lesions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154131
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.594
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.486
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSakoolnamarka, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorBurrow, MPen_US
dc.contributor.authorPrawer, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorTyas, MJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:23:25Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:23:25Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Adhesive Dentistry, 2000, v. 2 n. 4, p. 279-287en_US
dc.identifier.issn1461-5185en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154131-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the micromorphology of noncarious cervical lesions (NCCL) and the change occurring after acid conditioning. Materials and Methods: Nine wedge-shaped lesions, 9 saucer-shaped lesions, and 5 third molars with prepared cervical cavities were used. All NCCLs exhibited a hard, smooth surface with no discoloration. The teeth were sectioned and divided into three groups, each containing the three lesion types. Teeth in Group I were not etched, and teeth in Groups II and III were etched with 35% phosphoric acid and 20% polyacrylic acidβ% aluminum chloride, respectively. Field emission SEM and atomic force microscopy were used to examine the lesion surfaces. Results: The surfaces of the prepared cervical (control) lesions were covered with a smear layer. Treatment with phosphoric acid and polyacrylic acid resulted in removal of the smear layer, although some residual smear layer was found on the surface treated with polyacrylic acid. The images of the untreated surfaces of NCCL showed highly mineralized dentin with complete obliteration of the dentinal tubules. After treatment with phosphoric and polyacrylic acids, the images revealed demineralization of the surface, which was more pronounced on those treated with phosphoric acid. Conclusion: The mineral deposits on the surface of NCCL decreased the effect of acid conditioning. Although there was no apparent difference between the two forms of NCCL used in this study, further work is needed to better understand these lesions.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherQuintessence Publishing Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.quintessencepublishing.co.uk/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=3&products_id=243en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Adhesive Dentistryen_US
dc.titleMicromorphological investigation of noncarious cervical lesions treated with demineralizing agentsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailBurrow, MP:mfburr58@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityBurrow, MP=rp01306en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034577235en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034577235&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume2en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage279en_US
dc.identifier.epage287en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSakoolnamarka, R=6508034450en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBurrow, MP=7005876730en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPrawer, S=7006110206en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTyas, MJ=7006088443en_US

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