File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: ART restorations and sealants placed in Chinese school children results after three years

TitleART restorations and sealants placed in Chinese school children results after three years
Authors
KeywordsArt Restorations
China
Dental Caries
Glass-Ionomer
Sealants
Issue Date2000
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/COM
Citation
Community Dentistry And Oral Epidemiology, 2000, v. 28 n. 4, p. 314-320 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: These were to assess whether ART restorations and sealants could be provided to children in a school environment in China, to assess patient acceptability of the ART approach, and to evaluate on a longitudinal basis the treatments performed. Methods: This study was conducted in Deyang, Sichuan Province, in western China. A total of 294 ART restorations were placed in 197 children and 191 fissure sealants were placed in 140 children by five middle-level dentists in four secondary schools. Standard instruments and procedures for ART were used. The restorative material used was a high-strength glass-ionomer (Ketac-Molar, ESPE). The treatments were evaluated annually after placement by the same examiner who had not been involved in the placement of the restorations nor sealants using explorers and mouth-mirrors. At the 3-year examination an independent external examiner evaluated the restorations using USPHS criteria. Results: Most of the children did not report discomfort during treatment and 92% were willing to receive ART restorations again. The cumulative 1-year and 3-year survival rates of small Class I restorations were 99% and 92% respectively. The corresponding figures for large Class I restorations were 90% and 77%. After 3 years, 72% of the sealants were either partially or completely retained. Only 2% of the sealed teeth developed fissure caries and these involved teeth where the sealants had been lost. Similar success rates were found using USPHS criteria. Conclusions: The ART approach for preventing and treating tooth decay in Chinese school children was shown to be appropriate, effective and acceptable. The 3-year survival rates of the restorations were high but were related to the size and type of the restoration.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154111
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.233
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.111
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHolmgren, CJen_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, ECMen_US
dc.contributor.authorHu, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorWan, Hen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:23:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:23:19Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationCommunity Dentistry And Oral Epidemiology, 2000, v. 28 n. 4, p. 314-320en_US
dc.identifier.issn0301-5661en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154111-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: These were to assess whether ART restorations and sealants could be provided to children in a school environment in China, to assess patient acceptability of the ART approach, and to evaluate on a longitudinal basis the treatments performed. Methods: This study was conducted in Deyang, Sichuan Province, in western China. A total of 294 ART restorations were placed in 197 children and 191 fissure sealants were placed in 140 children by five middle-level dentists in four secondary schools. Standard instruments and procedures for ART were used. The restorative material used was a high-strength glass-ionomer (Ketac-Molar, ESPE). The treatments were evaluated annually after placement by the same examiner who had not been involved in the placement of the restorations nor sealants using explorers and mouth-mirrors. At the 3-year examination an independent external examiner evaluated the restorations using USPHS criteria. Results: Most of the children did not report discomfort during treatment and 92% were willing to receive ART restorations again. The cumulative 1-year and 3-year survival rates of small Class I restorations were 99% and 92% respectively. The corresponding figures for large Class I restorations were 90% and 77%. After 3 years, 72% of the sealants were either partially or completely retained. Only 2% of the sealed teeth developed fissure caries and these involved teeth where the sealants had been lost. Similar success rates were found using USPHS criteria. Conclusions: The ART approach for preventing and treating tooth decay in Chinese school children was shown to be appropriate, effective and acceptable. The 3-year survival rates of the restorations were high but were related to the size and type of the restoration.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/COMen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCommunity Dentistry and Oral Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subjectArt Restorationsen_US
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.subjectDental Cariesen_US
dc.subjectGlass-Ionomeren_US
dc.subjectSealantsen_US
dc.titleART restorations and sealants placed in Chinese school children results after three yearsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLo, ECM:hrdplcm@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLo, ECM=rp00015en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1034/j.1600-0528.2000.280410.x-
dc.identifier.pmid10901411-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034242521en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros49418-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034242521&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume28en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage314en_US
dc.identifier.epage320en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000087973200010-
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHolmgren, CJ=7003562695en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, ECM=7101705982en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, D=16202784600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWan, H=7201661037en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats