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Article: A study of the impact of oral health on the quality of life of older people in the UK--findings from a national survey.

TitleA study of the impact of oral health on the quality of life of older people in the UK--findings from a national survey.
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0734-0664&site=1
Citation
Gerodontology, 1998, v. 15 n. 2, p. 93-98 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to was to determine whether older adults perceive oral health as affecting their life quality and to identify variations in impacts in relation to socio-demographic factors, dental service utilisation and method of payment. DESIGN: This study formed part of the Office for National Statistics Omnibus Survey, which utilised a random probability sample of addresses from the British Postcode Address File (PAF). SETTING: 3,000 homes were selected from one hundred post sectors across Britain. Respondents were interviewed in their homes about how oral health affects their quality of life. Subjects 454 older people (aged 65 and over) took part in the survey. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The study group perceived oral health as impacting on their quality of life in general (negative and/or positive impact) (70%, 318), enhancing (53%, 241) and detracting (44%, 199) from their life quality. The most frequently perceived way in which oral health affects life quality was its effect on eating and comfort. Older people from higher socio-economic groups reported that oral health had a greater impact on their quality of life in general (positive and/or negative impacts), (OR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.22,2.78) and specifically, enhancing their quality of life (OR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.01,2.30). Those who reported attending the dentist within the last year perceived that their oral health enhanced their life quality (OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.01,2.38). CONCLUSIONS: Socio-economic background and dental attendance pattern are associated with how older people perceived oral health as affecting quality of life. These findings may have implications for promoting regular dental attendance and auditing dental services for older people.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154049
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.396
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.643

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMcgrath, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorBedi, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:23:00Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:23:00Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationGerodontology, 1998, v. 15 n. 2, p. 93-98en_US
dc.identifier.issn0734-0664en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/154049-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to was to determine whether older adults perceive oral health as affecting their life quality and to identify variations in impacts in relation to socio-demographic factors, dental service utilisation and method of payment. DESIGN: This study formed part of the Office for National Statistics Omnibus Survey, which utilised a random probability sample of addresses from the British Postcode Address File (PAF). SETTING: 3,000 homes were selected from one hundred post sectors across Britain. Respondents were interviewed in their homes about how oral health affects their quality of life. Subjects 454 older people (aged 65 and over) took part in the survey. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The study group perceived oral health as impacting on their quality of life in general (negative and/or positive impact) (70%, 318), enhancing (53%, 241) and detracting (44%, 199) from their life quality. The most frequently perceived way in which oral health affects life quality was its effect on eating and comfort. Older people from higher socio-economic groups reported that oral health had a greater impact on their quality of life in general (positive and/or negative impacts), (OR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.22,2.78) and specifically, enhancing their quality of life (OR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.01,2.30). Those who reported attending the dentist within the last year perceived that their oral health enhanced their life quality (OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.01,2.38). CONCLUSIONS: Socio-economic background and dental attendance pattern are associated with how older people perceived oral health as affecting quality of life. These findings may have implications for promoting regular dental attendance and auditing dental services for older people.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0734-0664&site=1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofGerodontologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshDental Care For Aged - Utilizationen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Health Services - Economics - Utilizationen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Health Surveysen_US
dc.subject.meshFees, Dentalen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGreat Britainen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshOral Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshQuality Of Lifeen_US
dc.subject.meshReimbursement Mechanismsen_US
dc.subject.meshSampling Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Classen_US
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_US
dc.titleA study of the impact of oral health on the quality of life of older people in the UK--findings from a national survey.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMcGrath, C:mcgrathc@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcGrath, C=rp00037en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid10530183-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032248966en_US
dc.identifier.volume15en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage93en_US
dc.identifier.epage98en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcGrath, C=7102335507en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBedi, R=7102041494en_US

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