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Article: The significance of sheeted dike complexes in ophiolites

TitleThe significance of sheeted dike complexes in ophiolites
Authors
Issue Date2008
Citation
Gsa Today, 2008, v. 18 n. 11, p. 4-10 How to Cite?
AbstractSheeted dike complexes, in which dike intrudes dike without intermediate screens of gabbro or pillow lava, have long been considered key features of oceanic lithosphere and ophiolites formed in extensional environments. The presence of a sheeted complex implies an approximate balance between spreading rate and magma supply, such that there is just enough melt to fill newly formed fractures produced by spreading. Such a balance appears to exist at mid-ocean ridges, where both the spreading rate and magma supply are probably linked to mantle convection, and thus sheeted dikes appear to be a major part of the ocean crust. In contrast, ophiolites, which are formed or modified in suprasubduction zone environments, rarely have large, well-developed sheeted dike complexes, because magma supply and spreading rate are not linked in the same way. In suprasubduction, zone environments, the spreading rate is controlled largely by the rate of slab rollback, whereas the magma supply is controlled by the local temperature profile, the lithology of the subducting crust and mantle wedge, the history and degree of melting of the mantle source, and the abundance and nature of fluids. Because spreading rate and magma supply are rarely balanced in these environments, we suggest that sheeted dikes, rather than being key elements of ophiolites, may instead be unusual features in such bodies. Thus, care must be exercised in using ophiolites to investigate spreading processes at mid-ocean ridges.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151270
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.459
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, PTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMalpas, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDilek, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhou, MFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:19:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:19:45Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationGsa Today, 2008, v. 18 n. 11, p. 4-10en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1052-5173en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151270-
dc.description.abstractSheeted dike complexes, in which dike intrudes dike without intermediate screens of gabbro or pillow lava, have long been considered key features of oceanic lithosphere and ophiolites formed in extensional environments. The presence of a sheeted complex implies an approximate balance between spreading rate and magma supply, such that there is just enough melt to fill newly formed fractures produced by spreading. Such a balance appears to exist at mid-ocean ridges, where both the spreading rate and magma supply are probably linked to mantle convection, and thus sheeted dikes appear to be a major part of the ocean crust. In contrast, ophiolites, which are formed or modified in suprasubduction zone environments, rarely have large, well-developed sheeted dike complexes, because magma supply and spreading rate are not linked in the same way. In suprasubduction, zone environments, the spreading rate is controlled largely by the rate of slab rollback, whereas the magma supply is controlled by the local temperature profile, the lithology of the subducting crust and mantle wedge, the history and degree of melting of the mantle source, and the abundance and nature of fluids. Because spreading rate and magma supply are rarely balanced in these environments, we suggest that sheeted dikes, rather than being key elements of ophiolites, may instead be unusual features in such bodies. Thus, care must be exercised in using ophiolites to investigate spreading processes at mid-ocean ridges.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofGSA Todayen_HK
dc.titleThe significance of sheeted dike complexes in ophiolitesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMalpas, J: jgmalpas@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhou, MF: mfzhou@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMalpas, J=rp00059en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhou, MF=rp00844en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1130/GSATG22A.1en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-55849131795en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-55849131795&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume18en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage4en_HK
dc.identifier.epage10en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRobinson, PT=7403720506en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMalpas, J=7006136845en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDilek, Y=7003520996en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, MF=7403506005en_HK

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