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Article: Microbial response to salinity change in Lake Chaka, a hypersaline lake on Tibetan plateau

TitleMicrobial response to salinity change in Lake Chaka, a hypersaline lake on Tibetan plateau
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EMI
Citation
Environmental Microbiology, 2007, v. 9 n. 10, p. 2603-2621 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious investigations of the salinity effects on the microbial community composition have largely been limited to dynamic estuaries and coastal solar salterns. In this study, the effects of salinity and mineralogy on microbial community composition was studied by using a 900-cm sediment core collected from a stable, inland hypersaline lake, Lake Chaka, on the Tibetan Plateau, north-western China. This core, spanning a time of 17 000 years, was unique in that it possessed an entire range of salinity from freshwater clays and silty sands at the bottom to gypsum and glauberite in the middle, to halite at the top. Bacterial and archaeal communities were studied along the length of this core using an integrated approach combining mineralogy and geochemistry, molecular microbiology (16S rRNA gene analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction), cultivation and lipid biomarker analyses. Systematic changes in microbial community composition were correlated with the salinity gradient, but not with mineralogy. Bacterial community was dominated by the Firmicutes-related environmental sequences and known species (including sulfate-reducing bacteria) in the freshwater sediments at the bottom, but by halophilic and halotolerant Betaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes in the hypersaline sediments at the top. Succession of proteobacterial groups along the salinity gradient, typically observed in free-living bacterial communities, was not observed in the sediment-associated community. Among Archaea, the Crenarchaeota were predominant in the bottom freshwater sediments, but the halophilic Halobacteriales of the Euryarchaeota was the most important group in the hypersaline sediments. Multiple isolates were obtained along the whole length of the core, and their salinity tolerance was consistent with the geochemical conditions. Iron-reducing bacteria were isolated in the freshwater sediments, which were capable of reducing structural Fe(III) in the Fe(III)-rich clay minerals predominant in the source sediment. These data have important implications for understanding how microorganisms respond to increased salinity in stable, inland water bodies. © 2007 The Authors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151217
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.932
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.002
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorDong, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorYu, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorJi, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, CLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:18:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:18:49Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Microbiology, 2007, v. 9 n. 10, p. 2603-2621en_US
dc.identifier.issn1462-2912en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151217-
dc.description.abstractPrevious investigations of the salinity effects on the microbial community composition have largely been limited to dynamic estuaries and coastal solar salterns. In this study, the effects of salinity and mineralogy on microbial community composition was studied by using a 900-cm sediment core collected from a stable, inland hypersaline lake, Lake Chaka, on the Tibetan Plateau, north-western China. This core, spanning a time of 17 000 years, was unique in that it possessed an entire range of salinity from freshwater clays and silty sands at the bottom to gypsum and glauberite in the middle, to halite at the top. Bacterial and archaeal communities were studied along the length of this core using an integrated approach combining mineralogy and geochemistry, molecular microbiology (16S rRNA gene analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction), cultivation and lipid biomarker analyses. Systematic changes in microbial community composition were correlated with the salinity gradient, but not with mineralogy. Bacterial community was dominated by the Firmicutes-related environmental sequences and known species (including sulfate-reducing bacteria) in the freshwater sediments at the bottom, but by halophilic and halotolerant Betaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes in the hypersaline sediments at the top. Succession of proteobacterial groups along the salinity gradient, typically observed in free-living bacterial communities, was not observed in the sediment-associated community. Among Archaea, the Crenarchaeota were predominant in the bottom freshwater sediments, but the halophilic Halobacteriales of the Euryarchaeota was the most important group in the hypersaline sediments. Multiple isolates were obtained along the whole length of the core, and their salinity tolerance was consistent with the geochemical conditions. Iron-reducing bacteria were isolated in the freshwater sediments, which were capable of reducing structural Fe(III) in the Fe(III)-rich clay minerals predominant in the source sediment. These data have important implications for understanding how microorganisms respond to increased salinity in stable, inland water bodies. © 2007 The Authors.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EMIen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAcridine Orange - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshArchaea - Growth & Development - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshBacteria - Growth & Development - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshBase Sequenceen_US
dc.subject.meshBiomassen_US
dc.subject.meshFatty Acids - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshFresh Water - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshGeologic Sediments - Analysis - Chemistry - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMinerals - Analysis - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshMolecular Sequence Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshPhospholipids - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_US
dc.subject.meshPolymerase Chain Reactionen_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Ribosomal, 16S - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshSalinityen_US
dc.subject.meshTibeten_US
dc.subject.meshWater Microbiologyen_US
dc.titleMicrobial response to salinity change in Lake Chaka, a hypersaline lake on Tibetan plateauen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, Y:yiliang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, Y=rp01354en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1462-2920.2007.01377.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid17803783-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34548418027en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34548418027&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage2603en_US
dc.identifier.epage2621en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000249222600020-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, H=35310680200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDong, H=7402335059en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, B=7402092753en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, X=20734706800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Y=27171876700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJi, S=20734733900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, CL=7405489900en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike1629435-

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