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Article: The Aoyougou Mafic-Ultramafic complex in the North Qilian Mountains, Northwest China: A possible Middle Proterozoic ophiolite along the Southern Margin of the North China Craton

TitleThe Aoyougou Mafic-Ultramafic complex in the North Qilian Mountains, Northwest China: A possible Middle Proterozoic ophiolite along the Southern Margin of the North China Craton
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherTaylor & Francis Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/TIGR
Citation
International Geology Review, 2003, v. 45 n. 9, p. 841-856 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Aoyougou mafic-ultramafic complex lies in the Paleozoic orogenic belt of the western part of the North Qilian Mountains near Aoyougou valley in Gansu Province, northwestern China. It consists of serpentinite, a cumulate sequence of gabbro and diorite, pillowed and massive lavas, diabase dikes, and chert, an assemblage tentatively interpreted as an ophiolite. SHRIMP dates on zircons from the diabase dikes indicate a crystallization age of 1777 ± 28 Ma. The basalts show light rare-earth element enrichment and have relatively high TiO2 and low Al2O3 contents, characteristic of present-day E-MORB or ocean-island lavas. All of the lavas have relatively low MgO contents and Mg numbers [100Mg/(Mg+Fe)], indicating a somewhat evolved character. The diabase dikes have flat chondrite-normalized REE patterns and are significantly more primitive than the lavas. Based on the lava geochemistry, the nature of the serpentinite, and the regional geology, the Aoyougou complex is interpreted as a fragment of oceanic lithosphere that may have formed at an oceanic spreading axis. Later subduction of oceanic lithosphere in the Middle Proterozoic produced a trench-arc-basin system, which is preserved in the North Qilian Mountains. The tectonically dismembered Aoyougou complex is similar in many respects to Phanerozoic ophiolites and suggests that modern-style plate tectonic processes in China may have begun as early as the Middle Proterozoic.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151113
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.365
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.248
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorMao, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, PTen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhou, MFen_US
dc.contributor.authorZuo, GCen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:17:14Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:17:14Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Geology Review, 2003, v. 45 n. 9, p. 841-856en_US
dc.identifier.issn0020-6814en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151113-
dc.description.abstractThe Aoyougou mafic-ultramafic complex lies in the Paleozoic orogenic belt of the western part of the North Qilian Mountains near Aoyougou valley in Gansu Province, northwestern China. It consists of serpentinite, a cumulate sequence of gabbro and diorite, pillowed and massive lavas, diabase dikes, and chert, an assemblage tentatively interpreted as an ophiolite. SHRIMP dates on zircons from the diabase dikes indicate a crystallization age of 1777 ± 28 Ma. The basalts show light rare-earth element enrichment and have relatively high TiO2 and low Al2O3 contents, characteristic of present-day E-MORB or ocean-island lavas. All of the lavas have relatively low MgO contents and Mg numbers [100Mg/(Mg+Fe)], indicating a somewhat evolved character. The diabase dikes have flat chondrite-normalized REE patterns and are significantly more primitive than the lavas. Based on the lava geochemistry, the nature of the serpentinite, and the regional geology, the Aoyougou complex is interpreted as a fragment of oceanic lithosphere that may have formed at an oceanic spreading axis. Later subduction of oceanic lithosphere in the Middle Proterozoic produced a trench-arc-basin system, which is preserved in the North Qilian Mountains. The tectonically dismembered Aoyougou complex is similar in many respects to Phanerozoic ophiolites and suggests that modern-style plate tectonic processes in China may have begun as early as the Middle Proterozoic.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/TIGRen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Geology Reviewen_US
dc.titleThe Aoyougou Mafic-Ultramafic complex in the North Qilian Mountains, Northwest China: A possible Middle Proterozoic ophiolite along the Southern Margin of the North China Cratonen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhou, MF: mfzhou@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhou, MF=rp00844en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0242338519en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros111465-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0242338519&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume45en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage841en_US
dc.identifier.epage856en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, Z=8597427000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMao, J=7402727757en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRobinson, PT=7403720506en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, MF=7403506005en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuochao, Z=6506632532en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, J=13805250200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, Z=7410045002en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, Z=8953512200en_US

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