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Article: Changes in the geography of suicide in young men: England and Wales 1981-2005

TitleChanges in the geography of suicide in young men: England and Wales 1981-2005
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Journal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2012, v. 66 n. 6, p. 536-543 How to Cite?
Abstract
Background Suicide rates changed considerably in men aged <45 years in England and Wales between 1980 and 2005. The impact of these changes on the geographic distribution of suicide is unknown. Methods Mapping of geo-coded standardised mortality ratios for suicide in 1113 census tracts (mean population 46 000) in England and Wales, smoothed using Bayesian hierarchical models, for 15-44 year old men during 1981-1985, 1991-1995 and 2001-2005. Results Young male suicide rates rose by 50% between the early 1980s and the 1990s but declined to pre-1980 levels by 2005. The spatial distribution of suicide changed markedly over these years. The 'bull'seye' pattern of increases in suicide rates from the suburbs to the centre of London was abolished, although they persisted in other major cities. Suicide rates among young men in Wales changed from being relatively lower than other regions to being considerably higher. Similarly, by 2001-2005 suicide rates in northern and south western regions were relatively higher than elsewhere with the predominant feature being a north-west/ south-east divide in suicide. These changes in the spatial epidemiology of suicide were not explained by changes in area levels of single person households, unemployment or the unmarried population. Conclusion There has been a marked change in the spatial epidemiology of suicide in young men in the last 25 years, particularly in central London where the RR of suicide has declined and Wales where risks have risen. These changes do not appear to be explained by recognised suicide risk factors and require investigation to inform prevention strategies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148856
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 3.294
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
ESRC/JISC
Funding Information:

Maps are based on boundary data provided through EDINA UKBORDERS with the support of the ESRC and JISC and uses boundary material which is copyright of the Crown. Mortality data were supplied by the Office for National Statistics. Census data were obtained from the Census Dissemination Unit, Mimas (University of Manchester), supported by the ESRC/JISC Census Programme. DG is an NIHR Senior Investigator.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGunnell, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorWheeler, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorChang, SSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorSterne, JACen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDorling, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-15T04:57:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-15T04:57:45Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2012, v. 66 n. 6, p. 536-543en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0143-005Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148856-
dc.description.abstractBackground Suicide rates changed considerably in men aged <45 years in England and Wales between 1980 and 2005. The impact of these changes on the geographic distribution of suicide is unknown. Methods Mapping of geo-coded standardised mortality ratios for suicide in 1113 census tracts (mean population 46 000) in England and Wales, smoothed using Bayesian hierarchical models, for 15-44 year old men during 1981-1985, 1991-1995 and 2001-2005. Results Young male suicide rates rose by 50% between the early 1980s and the 1990s but declined to pre-1980 levels by 2005. The spatial distribution of suicide changed markedly over these years. The 'bull'seye' pattern of increases in suicide rates from the suburbs to the centre of London was abolished, although they persisted in other major cities. Suicide rates among young men in Wales changed from being relatively lower than other regions to being considerably higher. Similarly, by 2001-2005 suicide rates in northern and south western regions were relatively higher than elsewhere with the predominant feature being a north-west/ south-east divide in suicide. These changes in the spatial epidemiology of suicide were not explained by changes in area levels of single person households, unemployment or the unmarried population. Conclusion There has been a marked change in the spatial epidemiology of suicide in young men in the last 25 years, particularly in central London where the RR of suicide has declined and Wales where risks have risen. These changes do not appear to be explained by recognised suicide risk factors and require investigation to inform prevention strategies.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Epidemiology and Community Healthen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Epidemiology & Community Health. Copyright © B M J Publishing Group.-
dc.rightsThis article has been accepted for publication in Journal of Epidemiology & Community HealthThe definitive copyedited, typeset version Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, 2012, v. 66 n. 6, p. 536-543 is available online at: http://jech.bmjjournals.com/-
dc.titleChanges in the geography of suicide in young men: England and Wales 1981-2005en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChang, SS: sschang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChang, SS=rp01582en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jech.2009.104000en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21131304-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862629859en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros215779-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84862629859&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume66en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage536en_HK
dc.identifier.epage543en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000303608800023-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGunnell, D=7006194937en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWheeler, B=7102860699en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChang, SS=35232386600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, B=7401507893en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSterne, JAC=7006014653en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDorling, D=7004860409en_HK

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