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Article: Interpreting differences in patterns of supportive care needs between patients with breast cancer and patients with colorectal cancer

TitleInterpreting differences in patterns of supportive care needs between patients with breast cancer and patients with colorectal cancer
Authors
KeywordsBreast cancer
Chinese
Colorectal cancer
Oncology
Perceived need
Supportive care
Issue Date2013
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
Psycho-Oncology, 2013, v. 22 n. 4, p. 792-798 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Understanding cancer patients' supportive care needs can help optimize health-care systems and inform services development. We therefore examined the prevalence of supportive care needs in Chinese breast (BC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to identify prevalence and correlates of unmet needs. Methods: We assessed supportive care needs (Supportive Care Needs Survey-Short Form), psychological distress (the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), symptom distress (The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale-Short Form), and satisfaction with care (Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire) among 210 Chinese BC (97) or CRC (104) outpatient clinic attendees. Results: Breast cancer patients (89.7%) reported more unmet needs (χ 2=4.409, p=0.027), but both CRC and BC samples ranked unmet needs prevalence similarly, with health system and information needs reported as the most common. Younger patients reported higher health system and information and sexuality needs. After multivariate adjustment, the strength of unmet needs did not differ by cancer type. Unmet psychological, physical and daily living, and sexuality needs were positively associated with greater symptom distress. Greater health system information needs were associated with high global distress and low depression scores, whereas greater psychological needs were associated with higher anxiety scores. Conclusions: Hong Kong Chinese BC and CRC patients strongly prioritized needs related to health systems and information provision. Symptoms and psychological distress were associated with unmet needs, reflecting a service shortfall in symptom management. Improving care provision by optimizing communication and clinic organization can better prepare cancer patients for their rehabilitation and improve symptom control. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146421
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, WWYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, WWTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAu, AHYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYe, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaw, WLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPoon, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwong, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSuen, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsang, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGirgis, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-24T07:53:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-24T07:53:10Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsycho-Oncology, 2013, v. 22 n. 4, p. 792-798en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146421-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Understanding cancer patients' supportive care needs can help optimize health-care systems and inform services development. We therefore examined the prevalence of supportive care needs in Chinese breast (BC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to identify prevalence and correlates of unmet needs. Methods: We assessed supportive care needs (Supportive Care Needs Survey-Short Form), psychological distress (the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), symptom distress (The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale-Short Form), and satisfaction with care (Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire) among 210 Chinese BC (97) or CRC (104) outpatient clinic attendees. Results: Breast cancer patients (89.7%) reported more unmet needs (χ 2=4.409, p=0.027), but both CRC and BC samples ranked unmet needs prevalence similarly, with health system and information needs reported as the most common. Younger patients reported higher health system and information and sexuality needs. After multivariate adjustment, the strength of unmet needs did not differ by cancer type. Unmet psychological, physical and daily living, and sexuality needs were positively associated with greater symptom distress. Greater health system information needs were associated with high global distress and low depression scores, whereas greater psychological needs were associated with higher anxiety scores. Conclusions: Hong Kong Chinese BC and CRC patients strongly prioritized needs related to health systems and information provision. Symptoms and psychological distress were associated with unmet needs, reflecting a service shortfall in symptom management. Improving care provision by optimizing communication and clinic organization can better prepare cancer patients for their rehabilitation and improve symptom control. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncologyen_HK
dc.subjectBreast canceren_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectColorectal canceren_HK
dc.subjectOncologyen_HK
dc.subjectPerceived needen_HK
dc.subjectSupportive careen_HK
dc.titleInterpreting differences in patterns of supportive care needs between patients with breast cancer and patients with colorectal canceren_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, WWT: wwtlam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLaw, WL: lawwl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPoon, J: tcjensen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTsang, J: jwhtsang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, WWT=rp00443en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, WL=rp00436en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPoon, J=rp01603en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTsang, J=rp00278en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.3068en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22419560-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84876033306en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros199131en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros214068-
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000317312200010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, WWY=55087616900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, WWT=7203022022en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAu, AHY=54387984500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYe, M=55086903000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, WL=7103147867en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, J=7005903722en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwong, A=55086365200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSuen, D=8876971300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsang, J=35141929400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGirgis, A=55088288500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFielding, R=55091844300en_HK

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