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Article: Molecular ecology meets remote sensing: Environmental drivers to population structure of humpback dolphins in the Western Indian Ocean

TitleMolecular ecology meets remote sensing: Environmental drivers to population structure of humpback dolphins in the Western Indian Ocean
Authors
Keywordsenvironmental drivers
population structure
remote sensing
Issue Date2011
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/hdy/
Citation
Heredity, 2011, v. 107 n. 4, p. 349-361 How to Cite?
AbstractGenetic analyses of population structure can be placed in explicit environmental contexts if appropriate environmental data are available. Here, we use high-coverage and high-resolution oceanographic and genetic sequence data to assess population structure patterns and their potential environmental influences for humpback dolphins in the Western Indian Ocean. We analyzed mitochondrial DNA data from 94 dolphins from the coasts of South Africa, Mozambique, Tanzania and Oman, employing frequency-based and maximum-likelihood algorithms to assess population structure and migration patterns. The genetic data were combined with 13 years of remote sensing oceanographic data of variables known to influence cetacean dispersal and population structure. Our analyses show strong and highly significant genetic structure between all putative populations, except for those in South Africa and Mozambique. Interestingly, the oceanographic data display marked environmental heterogeneity between all sampling areas and a degree of overlap between South Africa and Mozambique. Our combined analyses therefore suggest the occurrence of genetically isolated populations of humpback dolphins in areas that are environmentally distinct. This study highlights the utility of molecular tools in combination with high-resolution and high-coverage environmental data to address questions not only pertaining to genetic population structure, but also to relevant ecological processes in marine species. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140939
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.801
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.118
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Golden Fund
NASA
Microsoft Corporation
German Dolphin Conservation Society (Gesellschaft zur Rettung der Delphine e.V.)
Natural History Museum of Eduardo Mondlane University in Maputo
Texas A&M University at Galveston
Research Grant Council (RGC) Hong Kong
WWF Sweden
The Ford Environmental Grants
The UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Shell Marketing Oman
Petroleum Development Oman
Veritas Geophysical
The Peter Scott Trust for Education and Research in Conservation
Emirates Airlines
Salalah Port Services
DHL Worldwide Express
Truck Oman
Oman Air
Muscat Pharmacy
KPMG
Han-Padron and Associates
Marina Bandar al Rowdah
Funding Information:

We thank George Amato, Rob DeSalle, the Sackler Institute of Comparative Genomics, and the Lewis B and Dorothy Cullman Program in Molecular Systematics at AMNH for support in the laboratory. MM's work at the AMNH Marine Program is supported by the Golden Fund. We thank the NASA Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry program for funding AS and MM. Part of the analytical work was carried out with the resources of the Computational Biology Service Unit from Cornell University, which is partially funded by Microsoft Corporation. We thank the Ocean Biology Processing Group (Code 614.2) at the GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771, for the production and distribution of the ocean color data. Funding for the genetic work was provided from grants to HCR. This is LDEO contribution #7448. We are indebted to the Director and staff of the KwaZulu-Natal Sharks Board for collection of specimens from the shark nets in South Africa. The fieldwork in Mozambique was possible thanks to the support from German Dolphin Conservation Society (Gesellschaft zur Rettung der Delphine e.V.), Natural History Museum of Eduardo Mondlane University in Maputo, Marine Mammal Research Program of Texas A&M University at Galveston and General Research Fund (GRF) of Research Grant Council (RGC) Hong Kong. We thank the Institute of Marine Sciences, University of Dar es Salaam for their help with the collection of samples in Tanzania and especially Dr Narriman Jiddawi. WWF Sweden is acknowledged for their financial support while collecting the samples in Tanzania. Research was conducted and biopsies collected under research permit ZPR-82 and ZRP-98 issued by the Zanzibar Research Committee, Tanzania, and export of samples were done under CITES export permit 18320 issued by the Ministry of Natural Resources, Tanzania. Logistic support and research permits in Oman were provided by the Ministry of Regional Municipalities, Environment and Water Resources, the Oman Natural History Museum, and the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries. The fieldwork completed in Oman would not have been possible without the significant financial and logistic support provided by: The Ford Environmental Grants, The UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Shell Marketing Oman, Petroleum Development Oman, Veritas Geophysical, The Peter Scott Trust for Education and Research in Conservation, Emirates Airlines, Salalah Port Services, DHL Worldwide Express, Truck Oman, Oman Air, Muscat Pharmacy, KPMG, Han-Padron and Associates, and the Marina Bandar al Rowdah.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMendez, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorSubramaniam, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorMinton, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBaldwin, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorBerggren, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSärnblad, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAmir, OAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeddemors, VMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarczmarski, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorGuissamulo, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRosenbaum, HCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:22:07Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:22:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHeredity, 2011, v. 107 n. 4, p. 349-361en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0018-067Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140939-
dc.description.abstractGenetic analyses of population structure can be placed in explicit environmental contexts if appropriate environmental data are available. Here, we use high-coverage and high-resolution oceanographic and genetic sequence data to assess population structure patterns and their potential environmental influences for humpback dolphins in the Western Indian Ocean. We analyzed mitochondrial DNA data from 94 dolphins from the coasts of South Africa, Mozambique, Tanzania and Oman, employing frequency-based and maximum-likelihood algorithms to assess population structure and migration patterns. The genetic data were combined with 13 years of remote sensing oceanographic data of variables known to influence cetacean dispersal and population structure. Our analyses show strong and highly significant genetic structure between all putative populations, except for those in South Africa and Mozambique. Interestingly, the oceanographic data display marked environmental heterogeneity between all sampling areas and a degree of overlap between South Africa and Mozambique. Our combined analyses therefore suggest the occurrence of genetically isolated populations of humpback dolphins in areas that are environmentally distinct. This study highlights the utility of molecular tools in combination with high-resolution and high-coverage environmental data to address questions not only pertaining to genetic population structure, but also to relevant ecological processes in marine species. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/hdy/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHeredityen_HK
dc.subjectenvironmental driversen_HK
dc.subjectpopulation structureen_HK
dc.subjectremote sensingen_HK
dc.subject.meshDolphins - classification - genetics-
dc.subject.meshEcosystem-
dc.subject.meshGenetics, Population-
dc.subject.meshMarine Biology-
dc.subject.meshRemote Sensing Technology-
dc.titleMolecular ecology meets remote sensing: Environmental drivers to population structure of humpback dolphins in the Western Indian Oceanen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarczmarski, L: leszek@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarczmarski, L=rp00713en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/hdy.2011.21en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21427750-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3182502-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80053053529en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros196239en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80053053529&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume107en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage349en_HK
dc.identifier.epage361en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2540-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295159600007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMendez, M=23094830700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSubramaniam, A=7006752074en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCollins, T=54913882100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMinton, G=35739239000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaldwin, R=16063490300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBerggren, P=35423285400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSärnblad, A=14013189300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAmir, OA=8501606300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeddemors, VM=6602424096en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarczmarski, L=6603422145en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuissamulo, A=6507341369en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRosenbaum, HC=35556623900en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9050563-

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