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Article: Experimental and numerical studies of flows through and within high-rise building arrays and their link to ventilation strategy

TitleExperimental and numerical studies of flows through and within high-rise building arrays and their link to ventilation strategy
Authors
KeywordsAir exchanges
Building array
Building height
Clean air
Full scale
Issue Date2011
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jweia
Citation
Journal of Wind Engineering & Industrial Aerodynamics, 2011, v. 99 n. 10, p. 1036-1055 How to Cite?
AbstractUrban ventilation implies that wind from rural areas may supply relatively clean air into urban canopies and distribute rural air within them to help air exchange and pollutant dilution. This paper experimentally and numerically studied such flows through high-rise square building arrays as the approaching rural wind is parallel to the main streets. The street aspect ratio (building height/street width, H/W) is from 2 to 5.3 and the building area (or packing) density (λ p) is 0.25 or 0.4. Wind speed is found to decrease quickly through high-rise building arrays. For neighbourhood-scale building arrays (1-2km at full scale), the velocity may stop decreasing near leeward street entries due to vertical downward mixing induced by the wake. Strong shear layer exists near canopy roof levels producing three-dimensional (3D) vortexes in the secondary streets and considerable air exchanges across the boundaries with their surroundings. Building height variations may destroy or deviate 3D canyon vortexes and induced downward mean flow in front of taller buildings and upward flow behind taller buildings. With a power-law approaching wind profile, taller building arrays capture more rural air and experience a stronger wind within the urban canopy if the total street length is effectively limited. Wider streets (or smaller λ p), and suitable arrangements of building height variations may be good choices to improve the ventilation in high-rise urban areas. © 2011.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139379
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.024
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.097
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong on Initiative of Clean Energy for Environment
Funding Information:

The work in this paper is supported by a University Development Fund from the University of Hong Kong on Initiative of Clean Energy for Environment. We thank Mr L. Claesson in Sweden for his help in hotwire measurement in our wind tunnel studies. The help from Mr Kin Pong Kwok and Mr Wing Kam Leung in Hong Kong in making wind-tunnel models is also gratefully acknowledged.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHang, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSandberg, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:49:00Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:49:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Wind Engineering & Industrial Aerodynamics, 2011, v. 99 n. 10, p. 1036-1055en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0167-6105en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139379-
dc.description.abstractUrban ventilation implies that wind from rural areas may supply relatively clean air into urban canopies and distribute rural air within them to help air exchange and pollutant dilution. This paper experimentally and numerically studied such flows through high-rise square building arrays as the approaching rural wind is parallel to the main streets. The street aspect ratio (building height/street width, H/W) is from 2 to 5.3 and the building area (or packing) density (λ p) is 0.25 or 0.4. Wind speed is found to decrease quickly through high-rise building arrays. For neighbourhood-scale building arrays (1-2km at full scale), the velocity may stop decreasing near leeward street entries due to vertical downward mixing induced by the wake. Strong shear layer exists near canopy roof levels producing three-dimensional (3D) vortexes in the secondary streets and considerable air exchanges across the boundaries with their surroundings. Building height variations may destroy or deviate 3D canyon vortexes and induced downward mean flow in front of taller buildings and upward flow behind taller buildings. With a power-law approaching wind profile, taller building arrays capture more rural air and experience a stronger wind within the urban canopy if the total street length is effectively limited. Wider streets (or smaller λ p), and suitable arrangements of building height variations may be good choices to improve the ventilation in high-rise urban areas. © 2011.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jweiaen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Wind Engineering & Industrial Aerodynamicsen_HK
dc.subjectAir exchangesen_HK
dc.subjectBuilding arrayen_HK
dc.subjectBuilding heighten_HK
dc.subjectClean airen_HK
dc.subjectFull scaleen_HK
dc.titleExperimental and numerical studies of flows through and within high-rise building arrays and their link to ventilation strategyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHang, J: hangjian@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, Y: liyg@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLi, Y=rp00151en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jweia.2011.07.004en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80053333118en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros209895en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80053333118&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume99en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1036en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1055en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297529100005-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSandberg, M=35585315900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Y=7502094052en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHang, J=35240092500en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9623514-

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