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Article: Does vocational training in family medicine have an impact on antibiotic prescribing pattern?

TitleDoes vocational training in family medicine have an impact on antibiotic prescribing pattern?
Authors
KeywordsAntibiotics
Family medicine
GPs
Primary care
Training
Issue Date2011
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://fampra.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Family Practice, 2011, v. 28 n. 1, p. 56-62 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Antibiotics overuse is common and is the major cause of antibiotic resistance. Rational use of antibiotics by GPs is essential as most health problems are exclusively dealt within primary care. Postgraduate family medicine (FM) training has become established in various countries over the last few decades but little is known about the effect of FM training on antibiotic prescribing. Objective: To determine whether GPs with FM training prescribe less antibiotics than those without training. Methods: GPs working in a pluralistic primary health care system took part in the 2007-08 primary care morbidity and management survey in Hong Kong and collected information of all consecutive patient encounters during predetermined weeks of data collection. Characteristics of GPs, training status, patient morbidity and antibiotic prescribing pattern were compared using multivariate regression analyses. Results: One hundred and nine GPs, of whom 67 had FM training, participated in the study and recorded 69 973 health problems. The overall antibiotic prescribing ratewas 8.5% and that ofGPs with FM training was 5.4% compared with the 13.3% among those without. Multivariate logistic regression showed that GPs with FM training were less likely to prescribe antibiotics (odds ratio 0.68, P < 0.05). They had lower antibiotic prescribing rates when managing upper respiratory tract infections, acute bronchitis and cough but higher in treating infective conjunctivitis and acute laryngitis. Conclusions: Postgraduate FM training in Hong Kong is associated with significantly lower antibiotic prescribing rates. This supports the importance of FM training in rationalizing the use of antibiotics in Hong Kong. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135175
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.022
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.048
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Food and Health Bureau of the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative RegionSHS-P-11
Funding Information:

Studies in Health Services grant (No. SHS-P-11) from the Food and Health Bureau of the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, YYCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, CLKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMercer, SWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:29:30Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:29:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationFamily Practice, 2011, v. 28 n. 1, p. 56-62en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0263-2136en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135175-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Antibiotics overuse is common and is the major cause of antibiotic resistance. Rational use of antibiotics by GPs is essential as most health problems are exclusively dealt within primary care. Postgraduate family medicine (FM) training has become established in various countries over the last few decades but little is known about the effect of FM training on antibiotic prescribing. Objective: To determine whether GPs with FM training prescribe less antibiotics than those without training. Methods: GPs working in a pluralistic primary health care system took part in the 2007-08 primary care morbidity and management survey in Hong Kong and collected information of all consecutive patient encounters during predetermined weeks of data collection. Characteristics of GPs, training status, patient morbidity and antibiotic prescribing pattern were compared using multivariate regression analyses. Results: One hundred and nine GPs, of whom 67 had FM training, participated in the study and recorded 69 973 health problems. The overall antibiotic prescribing ratewas 8.5% and that ofGPs with FM training was 5.4% compared with the 13.3% among those without. Multivariate logistic regression showed that GPs with FM training were less likely to prescribe antibiotics (odds ratio 0.68, P < 0.05). They had lower antibiotic prescribing rates when managing upper respiratory tract infections, acute bronchitis and cough but higher in treating infective conjunctivitis and acute laryngitis. Conclusions: Postgraduate FM training in Hong Kong is associated with significantly lower antibiotic prescribing rates. This supports the importance of FM training in rationalizing the use of antibiotics in Hong Kong. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://fampra.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofFamily Practiceen_HK
dc.subjectAntibioticsen_HK
dc.subjectFamily medicineen_HK
dc.subjectGPsen_HK
dc.subjectPrimary careen_HK
dc.subjectTrainingen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use-
dc.subject.meshDrug Resistance, Microbial-
dc.subject.meshDrug Utilization-
dc.subject.meshFamily Practice - education - standards-
dc.subject.meshPhysician's Practice Patterns - standards - statistics and numerical data-
dc.titleDoes vocational training in family medicine have an impact on antibiotic prescribing pattern?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0263-2136&volume=28&issue=1&spage=56&epage=62&date=2010&atitle=Does+vocational+training+in+family+medicine+have+an+impact+on+antibiotic+prescribing+pattern?-
dc.identifier.emailLo, YYC: yve_lo@yahoo.com.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, CLK: clklam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFong, DYT: dytfong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLo, YYC=rp00512en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, CLK=rp00350en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFong, DYT=rp00253en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/fampra/cmq065en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20696754-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79251472118en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros186363en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79251472118&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume28en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage56en_HK
dc.identifier.epage62en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000286467200009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.relation.projectMorbidity and management patterns of community-based primary health care services in Hong Kong-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, YYC=16022308000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, CLK=24755913900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMercer, SW=7005913632en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFong, DYT=35261710300en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8739566-

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