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Conference Paper: Daily visibility and mortality: assessment of health benefits from improving visibility in Hong Kong
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TitleDaily visibility and mortality: assessment of health benefits from improving visibility in Hong Kong
 
AuthorsThach, TQ
Wong, CM
Chan, KP
Chau, YK
Chung, YN
Ou, CQ
Yang, L
Hedley, AJ
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.com
 
CitationThe 22nd Joint Conference of International Society of Exposure Science & International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISES-ISEE 2010), Seoul, Korea, 28 August-1 September 2010. In Epidemiology, 2011, v. 22 January suppl., p. S224 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.ede.0000392374.77978.64
 
AbstractBackground/Aims: Visibility in Hong Kong has deteriorated significantly over 40 years with the frequency of visibility below 8 km in the absence of fog, mist, or precipitation, increasing from 6.6 days in 1968 to 54.1 days in 2007. Methods: During 1996–2006, we obtained mortality data for all natural and cardiorespiratory causes, visibility recorded as visual range in kilometers, temperature and relative humidity from an urban observatory, and concentrations of 4 criteria pollutants. A generalized additive Poisson regression model with penalized cubic regression splines was fitted to control for time–varying covariates. Results: For all natural causes of mortality an interquartile range of 6.5 km increase in visibility at lag 0–1 days was associated with an excess risk (ER%) (95% Confidence Interval) of -1.13 [-1.76, -0.49] for all ages and -1.37 [-2.09, -0.65] for ages 65+; for cardiovascular mortality of -1.31 [-2.49, -0.13] for all ages, and -1.72 [-3.00, -0.44] for ages 65+; for respiratory mortality of -1.92 [-3.35, -0.49] for all ages and -1.76 [-3.25, -0.28] for ages 65+. The estimated ER% for daily mortality derived from both visibility and air pollutant data were comparable in terms of magnitude, lag pattern, and dose-response relationships especially when using particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <=10 µm to predict mortality associated with visibility. Conclusion: Visibility provides a useful proxy for the assessment of environmental health risks from ambient air pollutants and a valid approach for the assessment of the public health impacts of air pollution and the benefits of air quality improvement measures in developing countries where pollutant monitoring data are scarce.
 
DescriptionThis journal suppl. is conference proceedings of ISES-ISEE 2010
Poster
 
ISSN1044-3983
2012 Impact Factor: 5.738
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.155
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.ede.0000392374.77978.64
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000285400800682
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorThach, TQ
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, CM
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, KP
 
dc.contributor.authorChau, YK
 
dc.contributor.authorChung, YN
 
dc.contributor.authorOu, CQ
 
dc.contributor.authorYang, L
 
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJ
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-15T03:07:51Z
 
dc.date.available2011-07-15T03:07:51Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractBackground/Aims: Visibility in Hong Kong has deteriorated significantly over 40 years with the frequency of visibility below 8 km in the absence of fog, mist, or precipitation, increasing from 6.6 days in 1968 to 54.1 days in 2007. Methods: During 1996–2006, we obtained mortality data for all natural and cardiorespiratory causes, visibility recorded as visual range in kilometers, temperature and relative humidity from an urban observatory, and concentrations of 4 criteria pollutants. A generalized additive Poisson regression model with penalized cubic regression splines was fitted to control for time–varying covariates. Results: For all natural causes of mortality an interquartile range of 6.5 km increase in visibility at lag 0–1 days was associated with an excess risk (ER%) (95% Confidence Interval) of -1.13 [-1.76, -0.49] for all ages and -1.37 [-2.09, -0.65] for ages 65+; for cardiovascular mortality of -1.31 [-2.49, -0.13] for all ages, and -1.72 [-3.00, -0.44] for ages 65+; for respiratory mortality of -1.92 [-3.35, -0.49] for all ages and -1.76 [-3.25, -0.28] for ages 65+. The estimated ER% for daily mortality derived from both visibility and air pollutant data were comparable in terms of magnitude, lag pattern, and dose-response relationships especially when using particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <=10 µm to predict mortality associated with visibility. Conclusion: Visibility provides a useful proxy for the assessment of environmental health risks from ambient air pollutants and a valid approach for the assessment of the public health impacts of air pollution and the benefits of air quality improvement measures in developing countries where pollutant monitoring data are scarce.
 
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. is conference proceedings of ISES-ISEE 2010
 
dc.descriptionPoster
 
dc.description.otherThe 22nd Joint Conference of International Society of Exposure Science & International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISES-ISEE 2010), Seoul, Korea, 28 August-1 September 2010. In Epidemiology, 2011, v. 22 January suppl., p. S224
 
dc.identifier.citationThe 22nd Joint Conference of International Society of Exposure Science & International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISES-ISEE 2010), Seoul, Korea, 28 August-1 September 2010. In Epidemiology, 2011, v. 22 January suppl., p. S224 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.ede.0000392374.77978.64
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.ede.0000392374.77978.64
 
dc.identifier.epageS224
 
dc.identifier.hkuros184324
 
dc.identifier.hkuros186196
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000285400800682
 
dc.identifier.issn1044-3983
2012 Impact Factor: 5.738
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.155
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.spageS224
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/134769
 
dc.identifier.volume22
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.com
 
dc.relation.ispartofEpidemiology
 
dc.titleDaily visibility and mortality: assessment of health benefits from improving visibility in Hong Kong
 
dc.typeConference_Paper
 
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<contributor.author>Wong, CM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, KP</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chau, YK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chung, YN</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ou, CQ</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yang, L</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Hedley, AJ</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2011-07-15T03:07:51Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2011-07-15T03:07:51Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2011</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>The 22nd Joint Conference of International Society of Exposure Science &amp; International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISES-ISEE 2010), Seoul, Korea, 28 August-1 September 2010. In Epidemiology, 2011, v. 22 January suppl., p. S224</identifier.citation>
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<description>Poster</description>
<description.abstract>Background/Aims:   
Visibility in Hong Kong has deteriorated significantly over 40 years with the frequency of visibility below 8 km in the absence of fog, mist, or precipitation, increasing from 6.6 days in 1968 to 54.1 days in 2007.
   
Methods:   
During 1996&#8211;2006, we obtained mortality data for all natural and cardiorespiratory causes, visibility recorded as visual range in kilometers, temperature and relative humidity from an urban observatory, and concentrations of 4 criteria pollutants. A generalized additive Poisson regression model with penalized cubic regression splines was fitted to control for time&#8211;varying covariates.
   
Results:   
For all natural causes of mortality an interquartile range of 6.5 km increase in visibility at lag 0&#8211;1 days was associated with an excess risk (ER%) (95% Confidence Interval) of -1.13 [-1.76, -0.49] for all ages and -1.37 [-2.09, -0.65] for ages 65+; for cardiovascular mortality of -1.31 [-2.49, -0.13] for all ages, and -1.72 [-3.00, -0.44] for ages 65+; for respiratory mortality of -1.92 [-3.35, -0.49] for all ages and -1.76 [-3.25, -0.28] for ages 65+. The estimated ER% for daily mortality derived from both visibility and air pollutant data were comparable in terms of magnitude, lag pattern, and dose-response relationships especially when using particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter &lt;=10 &#181;m to predict mortality associated with visibility.
   
Conclusion:   
Visibility provides a useful proxy for the assessment of environmental health risks from ambient air pollutants and a valid approach for the assessment of the public health impacts of air pollution and the benefits of air quality improvement measures in developing countries where pollutant monitoring data are scarce.</description.abstract>
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