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Article: Children's over-the-counter medicines pharmacoepidemiological (COPE) study

TitleChildren's over-the-counter medicines pharmacoepidemiological (COPE) study
Authors
KeywordsArticle
Child Care
Childhood Disease
Consultation
Controlled Study
Coughing
Drug Use
Health Promotion
Human
Parental Attitude
Patient Referral
Pharmaceutical Care
Pharmacy
Prescription
Priority Journal
Sore Throat
Symptomatology
Issue Date2007
PublisherPharmaceutical Press
Citation
International Journal Of Pharmacy Practice, 2007, v. 15 n. 1, p. 17-22 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To quantify the extent and types of minor ailments in children that were presented at community pharmacies and the types of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines purchased in response to these ailments. Method: Data on all requests and sales of OTC medicines for children (aged 16 years and under) and consultations for minor ailments in children were recorded in eight community pharmacies for one week every month over a 12-month period. Participants were members of the public who consulted the pharmacists or other pharmacy staff in the community pharmacies. Key findings: A total of 976 consultations was recorded with 61.5% requesting an OTC medicine by name and 38.5% by symptom presentation. An average of 10.2 consultations was made per pharmacy per week. Requests for treatment were usually made within five days of symptom occurrence (86%). Most of the consultations were made by mothers (75%), although 17% were by fathers. The most commonly purchased OTC medicine was paracetamol. There were five requests for aspirin and one was for a 2-year old child. A total of 62 cases (6%) was referred back to the child's primary care physician (general practitioner). Conclusions: Symptoms related to cough and cold were the most common problems in children presenting to community pharmacies for treatment. Paracetamol was the most widely used OTC medicine in children. Pharmacy staff do question the request for OTC medicines such as aspirin, to ensure its safe use. Community pharmacies play an important role as the first port of call for advice on minor ailments in children and have an opportunity to provide health promotion to carers of children. © 2007 The Authors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132867
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.428
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSiew, SCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEdmondson, Hen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-04T07:57:41Z-
dc.date.available2011-04-04T07:57:41Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Pharmacy Practice, 2007, v. 15 n. 1, p. 17-22en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0961-7671en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/132867-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To quantify the extent and types of minor ailments in children that were presented at community pharmacies and the types of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines purchased in response to these ailments. Method: Data on all requests and sales of OTC medicines for children (aged 16 years and under) and consultations for minor ailments in children were recorded in eight community pharmacies for one week every month over a 12-month period. Participants were members of the public who consulted the pharmacists or other pharmacy staff in the community pharmacies. Key findings: A total of 976 consultations was recorded with 61.5% requesting an OTC medicine by name and 38.5% by symptom presentation. An average of 10.2 consultations was made per pharmacy per week. Requests for treatment were usually made within five days of symptom occurrence (86%). Most of the consultations were made by mothers (75%), although 17% were by fathers. The most commonly purchased OTC medicine was paracetamol. There were five requests for aspirin and one was for a 2-year old child. A total of 62 cases (6%) was referred back to the child's primary care physician (general practitioner). Conclusions: Symptoms related to cough and cold were the most common problems in children presenting to community pharmacies for treatment. Paracetamol was the most widely used OTC medicine in children. Pharmacy staff do question the request for OTC medicines such as aspirin, to ensure its safe use. Community pharmacies play an important role as the first port of call for advice on minor ailments in children and have an opportunity to provide health promotion to carers of children. © 2007 The Authors.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPharmaceutical Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Pharmacy Practiceen_HK
dc.subjectArticleen_US
dc.subjectChild Careen_US
dc.subjectChildhood Diseaseen_US
dc.subjectConsultationen_US
dc.subjectControlled Studyen_US
dc.subjectCoughingen_US
dc.subjectDrug Useen_US
dc.subjectHealth Promotionen_US
dc.subjectHumanen_US
dc.subjectParental Attitudeen_US
dc.subjectPatient Referralen_US
dc.subjectPharmaceutical Careen_US
dc.subjectPharmacyen_US
dc.subjectPrescriptionen_US
dc.subjectPriority Journalen_US
dc.subjectSore Throaten_US
dc.subjectSymptomatologyen_US
dc.titleChildren's over-the-counter medicines pharmacoepidemiological (COPE) studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK: wongick@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1211/ijpp.15.1.0004en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33847692793en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33847692793&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume15en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage17en_HK
dc.identifier.epage22en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ICK=7102513915en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSiew, SC=16032554500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEdmondson, H=17340277200en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike1132681-

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