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Article: Prevalence of occult hepatitis B infection in a highly endemic area for chronic hepatitis B: A study of a large blood donor population
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TitlePrevalence of occult hepatitis B infection in a highly endemic area for chronic hepatitis B: A study of a large blood donor population
 
AuthorsYuen, MF2
Lee, CK1
Wong, DKH2
Fung, J2
Hung, I2
Hsu, A2
But, DYK2
Cheung, TK2
Chan, P2
Yuen, JCH2
Fung, FKC2
Seto, WK2
Lin, CK1
Lai, CL2
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://gut.bmjjournals.com/
 
CitationGut, 2010, v. 59 n. 10, p. 1389-1393 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gut.2010.209148
 
AbstractBackground and aims: The aim of the present study was to determine the population prevalence of occult hepatitis B (OHB) infection and its clinical profile in a highly endemic area of chronic hepatitis B virus disease. Methods: OHB was first identified by individual sample testing for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) followed by nucleic acid testing (NAT) and vice versa for 3044 (cohort 1, stored sera from donation within 1 year) and 9990 (cohort 2, prospective study) blood donors, respectively. OHB was confirmed meticulously by ≥2 out of 3 tests with detectable hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA using a sensitive standardised assay. Detailed serology and viral load in the serum and liver were studied. Results: The prevalence of OHB was 0.13% (4/3044) and 0.11% (11/9967) for cohort 1 and 2, respectively. In cohort 2, 10 out of 11 OHB samples were positive for anti-HBc (hepatitis B core antigen) antibody (all were immunoglobulin G). Seven had detectable anti-HBs. The serum HBV DNA levels were extremely low (highest 14.1 IU/ml). Of the six donors who underwent liver biopsies, all had normal liver biochemistry, extremely low liver HBV DNA (highest 6.21 copies/cell) and nearly normal liver histology. For those with viral sequence generation, none had the common HBsAg mutant G145R. Conclusions: The prevalence of OHB in a highly endemic area of chronic HBV was very low, thus implying a low impact on transfusion services. To implement universal screening, the high cost of NAT should be taken into account. OHB blood donors had very low HBV replication, and normal liver biochemistry and histology, conferring a favourable prognosis.
 
ISSN0017-5749
2013 Impact Factor: 13.319
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gut.2010.209148
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000282661300017
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorYuen, MF
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, CK
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, DKH
 
dc.contributor.authorFung, J
 
dc.contributor.authorHung, I
 
dc.contributor.authorHsu, A
 
dc.contributor.authorBut, DYK
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, TK
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, P
 
dc.contributor.authorYuen, JCH
 
dc.contributor.authorFung, FKC
 
dc.contributor.authorSeto, WK
 
dc.contributor.authorLin, CK
 
dc.contributor.authorLai, CL
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-31T11:10:35Z
 
dc.date.available2010-10-31T11:10:35Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractBackground and aims: The aim of the present study was to determine the population prevalence of occult hepatitis B (OHB) infection and its clinical profile in a highly endemic area of chronic hepatitis B virus disease. Methods: OHB was first identified by individual sample testing for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) followed by nucleic acid testing (NAT) and vice versa for 3044 (cohort 1, stored sera from donation within 1 year) and 9990 (cohort 2, prospective study) blood donors, respectively. OHB was confirmed meticulously by ≥2 out of 3 tests with detectable hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA using a sensitive standardised assay. Detailed serology and viral load in the serum and liver were studied. Results: The prevalence of OHB was 0.13% (4/3044) and 0.11% (11/9967) for cohort 1 and 2, respectively. In cohort 2, 10 out of 11 OHB samples were positive for anti-HBc (hepatitis B core antigen) antibody (all were immunoglobulin G). Seven had detectable anti-HBs. The serum HBV DNA levels were extremely low (highest 14.1 IU/ml). Of the six donors who underwent liver biopsies, all had normal liver biochemistry, extremely low liver HBV DNA (highest 6.21 copies/cell) and nearly normal liver histology. For those with viral sequence generation, none had the common HBsAg mutant G145R. Conclusions: The prevalence of OHB in a highly endemic area of chronic HBV was very low, thus implying a low impact on transfusion services. To implement universal screening, the high cost of NAT should be taken into account. OHB blood donors had very low HBV replication, and normal liver biochemistry and histology, conferring a favourable prognosis.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.identifier.citationGut, 2010, v. 59 n. 10, p. 1389-1393 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gut.2010.209148
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gut.2010.209148
 
dc.identifier.epage1393
 
dc.identifier.hkuros179939
 
dc.identifier.hkuros213682
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000282661300017
 
dc.identifier.issn0017-5749
2013 Impact Factor: 13.319
 
dc.identifier.issue10
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid20675695
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77957190181
 
dc.identifier.spage1389
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/125086
 
dc.identifier.volume59
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://gut.bmjjournals.com/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofGut
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshBlood Donors - statistics and numerical data
 
dc.subject.meshCarrier State - epidemiology - pathology
 
dc.subject.meshHepatitis B, Chronic - epidemiology - pathology
 
dc.titlePrevalence of occult hepatitis B infection in a highly endemic area for chronic hepatitis B: A study of a large blood donor population
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Hong Kong Hospital Authority
  2. The University of Hong Kong