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Article: Effect of temperature on removal of iron cyanides from solution by maize plants

TitleEffect of temperature on removal of iron cyanides from solution by maize plants
Authors
KeywordsIron cyanide
Maize
Phytoremediation
Removal
Temperature
Issue Date2010
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/environment/journal/11356
Citation
Environmental Science And Pollution Research, 2010, v. 17 n. 1, p. 106-114 How to Cite?
AbstractGoal, scope, and background: Cyanide is commonly found in soils and groundwater complexed with iron as ferro- and ferri-cyanide. It is evident that plants are capable of tolerating, transporting, and assimilating iron cyanides. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of temperatures on the removal and bioaccumulation of two chemical forms of iron cyanides by maize seedlings. Materials and methods: Maize (Zea mays L. var. ZN 304) seedlings were grown hydroponically and treated with ferro- or ferri-cyanide in solution for 5 days. Six different temperatures were tested ranging from 12 to 27°C. Total cyanide in solution phase and plant tissues was analyzed spectrophotometrically. The temperature coefficient (Q10) was also determined for maize exposed to both iron cyanides. Results: The dissociation of both iron cyanides to free cyanide in solution was below the detection limit. Maize seedlings showed a significantly higher removal potential for ferro-cyanide than ferri-cyanide at all treatment temperatures. Analysis of mass balance revealed that the majority of these iron cyanides taken up from the hydroponic solutions was assimilated by maize, and roots were the major sink for cyanide accumulation. The Q10 values were determined for ferro- and ferri-cyanide to be 2. 31 and 2. 75, respectively. Discussion: Due to the significant difference in the removal rate between the two species of iron cyanides by plant, the conversion of ferri- to ferro-cyanide in aqueous solution prior to uptake is unlikely. Compared to the treatments amended with ferro-cyanide, more cyanide was recovered in plant materials of maize when exposed to ferri-cyanide, implying that ferri-cyanide is less sensitive to degradation than ferro-cyanide. Although the velocity of botanical assimilation of ferro-cyanide was faster than that of ferri-cyanide at any of the treatment temperatures, the removal of ferri-cyanide by maize was more sensitive to changes in temperature than that of ferro-cyanide. Conclusions: Removal of both iron cyanides by maize seedlings was observed to be positive in response to temperatures. Changes in temperatures have a substantial influence on not only the uptake and assimilation of ferro- and ferri-cyanide by maize but also cyanide accumulation in plant tissues. Recommendations: As one of the crucial abiotic factors involved in phytoremediation, temperature shows a positive influence on the removal of iron cyanides by plants. Further investigation on the fate of ferro- and ferri-cyanide in plant tissues would have helped distinguish the differences in the botanical assimilation pathways between the two iron cyanides. Perspectives: The ability of maize to remove iron cyanides has important implications on the vegetation management of environmental contamination. © Springer-Verlag 2009.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124078
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.76
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.886
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Natural Science Research Foundation of ChinaNSFC30770389
Hong Kong SAR GovernmentCAG HKUST 3/04C
Funding Information:

This work was supported by The Natural Science Research Foundation of China (NSFC30770389) and partially by CAG HKUST 3/04C from Hong Kong Research Grant Council of Hong Kong SAR Government.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYu, XZen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGu, JDen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-20T07:49:10Z-
dc.date.available2010-10-20T07:49:10Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Science And Pollution Research, 2010, v. 17 n. 1, p. 106-114en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0944-1344en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/124078-
dc.description.abstractGoal, scope, and background: Cyanide is commonly found in soils and groundwater complexed with iron as ferro- and ferri-cyanide. It is evident that plants are capable of tolerating, transporting, and assimilating iron cyanides. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of temperatures on the removal and bioaccumulation of two chemical forms of iron cyanides by maize seedlings. Materials and methods: Maize (Zea mays L. var. ZN 304) seedlings were grown hydroponically and treated with ferro- or ferri-cyanide in solution for 5 days. Six different temperatures were tested ranging from 12 to 27°C. Total cyanide in solution phase and plant tissues was analyzed spectrophotometrically. The temperature coefficient (Q10) was also determined for maize exposed to both iron cyanides. Results: The dissociation of both iron cyanides to free cyanide in solution was below the detection limit. Maize seedlings showed a significantly higher removal potential for ferro-cyanide than ferri-cyanide at all treatment temperatures. Analysis of mass balance revealed that the majority of these iron cyanides taken up from the hydroponic solutions was assimilated by maize, and roots were the major sink for cyanide accumulation. The Q10 values were determined for ferro- and ferri-cyanide to be 2. 31 and 2. 75, respectively. Discussion: Due to the significant difference in the removal rate between the two species of iron cyanides by plant, the conversion of ferri- to ferro-cyanide in aqueous solution prior to uptake is unlikely. Compared to the treatments amended with ferro-cyanide, more cyanide was recovered in plant materials of maize when exposed to ferri-cyanide, implying that ferri-cyanide is less sensitive to degradation than ferro-cyanide. Although the velocity of botanical assimilation of ferro-cyanide was faster than that of ferri-cyanide at any of the treatment temperatures, the removal of ferri-cyanide by maize was more sensitive to changes in temperature than that of ferro-cyanide. Conclusions: Removal of both iron cyanides by maize seedlings was observed to be positive in response to temperatures. Changes in temperatures have a substantial influence on not only the uptake and assimilation of ferro- and ferri-cyanide by maize but also cyanide accumulation in plant tissues. Recommendations: As one of the crucial abiotic factors involved in phytoremediation, temperature shows a positive influence on the removal of iron cyanides by plants. Further investigation on the fate of ferro- and ferri-cyanide in plant tissues would have helped distinguish the differences in the botanical assimilation pathways between the two iron cyanides. Perspectives: The ability of maize to remove iron cyanides has important implications on the vegetation management of environmental contamination. © Springer-Verlag 2009.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/environment/journal/11356en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Science and Pollution Researchen_HK
dc.subjectIron cyanideen_HK
dc.subjectMaizeen_HK
dc.subjectPhytoremediationen_HK
dc.subjectRemovalen_HK
dc.subjectTemperatureen_HK
dc.subject.meshFerricyanides - isolation and purification - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshFerrocyanides - isolation and purification - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshTemperature-
dc.subject.meshWater Pollutants, Chemical - isolation and purification - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshZea mays - growth and development - metabolism-
dc.titleEffect of temperature on removal of iron cyanides from solution by maize plantsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0944-1344&volume=17&issue=1&spage=106&epage=114&date=2010&atitle=Effect+of+temperature+on+removal+of+iron+cyanides+from+solution+by+maize+plants-
dc.identifier.emailGu, JD: jdgu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGu, JD=rp00701en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11356-009-0173-xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19466473-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-73949136836en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros172624-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-73949136836&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume17en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage106en_HK
dc.identifier.epage114en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000273311100011-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, XZ=24449490500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, JD=7403129601en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike4690043-

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