Hybridized Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries for Flexible and Scalable Electricity Storage


Grant Data
Project Title
Hybridized Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries for Flexible and Scalable Electricity Storage
Principal Investigator
Professor Chan, Godwin Kwong Yu   (Project coordinator)
Co-Investigator(s)
Dr Li Chi Ying Vanessa   (Co-Investigator)
Dr Zhong Jin   (Co-Investigator)
Duration
18
Start Date
2013-07-01
Completion Date
2014-12-31
Amount
998770
Conference Title
Presentation Title
Keywords
Hybridized Vanadium, Scalable Electricity Storage
Discipline
Others - Physical Sciences
Panel
Physical Sciences
HKU Project Code
ITS/290/12
Grant Type
Innovation and Technology Support Programme (Tier 3)
Funding Year
2012/2013
Status
Completed
Objectives
With the rapid growth in implementation of electricity generation from wind and solar energy across the world, integration of renewables to flow battery as energy storage system is one of the viable solution to meet electricity demand, as both energy and power can be scaled independently to different application at lower cost. Present lead acid battery can only be used as grid support for short duration of storage, whereas the all Vanadium redox flow battery suffers from low voltage and low energy density. This project will address the fluctuation deficiency of renewable energy sources by a novel hybridized Vanadium flow system as practical energy storage system. The specific objectives are to: 1. optimize the operating parameters of Vanadium-metal hydride (MH) hybrid rechargeable flow system as intermittent energy storage; 2. fabricate a prototype for Vanadium-MH flow system to demonstrate the performance as an intermittent energy storage system; 3. investigate the feasibility of Vanadium-hydrogen flow system with further improved performance. The output will connect the missing link of the electricity industry, a highly efficient and cost-effective energy storage medium that warrants power quality and reliability from intermittent renewable energy sources, maximizes value to transmission and distribution resources, and minimizes greenhouse gas emission.